Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

The Montshire’s Steps to Sustainability Offers Opportunities for Discovery

Nov 06, 2017
For Immediate Release

In mid-October, the Montshire Museum of Science installed a new wood pellet boiler system as part of ongoing efforts to achieve more environmentally sustainable operations at the Museum. To celebrate this move towards building a greener organization, the Montshire is hosting a series of special events that will share the Museum’s experience and offer information from experts on renewable energy. 

On Tuesday, November 14, 6:30–7:30pm, the Montshire will host “Steps to Sustainability: A Path to Renewable Energy,” a panel presentation with representatives from the Northern Forest Center, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation, Clean Energy Development Fund, and Lyme Green Heat. Using the Montshire’s installation process as a starting point, the guest speakers will expand on the role of local biomass in reducing our region’s carbon footprint and offer examples of what can be done to support such efforts. The evening will end with a tour of the wood pellet boiler. 

On Saturday, November 18, 1–4pm, the Montshire will present “Exploring Energy,” an afternoon of programs highlighting different types of alternative energy. Visitors can view the wood pellet boiler, speak with local energy experts, and take part in hands-on activities at the Science Discovery Lab, which will demonstrate how electricity can be generated from wind and solar. 

“We want to do the best that we can with the technology today,” said Montshire Executive Director Marcos Stafne. “As a science museum, we always want people to know how their world works. We want people to know about available solutions that help fight big problems like climate change.” 


Why a Wood Pellet Boiler?
The Montshire’s decision to switch to a wood pellet boiler was prompted after a comprehensive energy audit earlier this year by Zero by Degrees, a Vermont-based consulting firm that specializes in energy-efficient projects. Along with their top recommendation of a conversion from oil to wood pellet boilers, Zero by Degrees conducted a thorough review of Montshire-specific needs and the capabilities of various vendors to meet them. 

The Montshire was able to proceed with Zero by Degrees’s recommendation to work with Lyme Green Heat on the boiler installation through aid and support from Vermont’s Clean Energy Development Fund (established to increase the development and deployment of cost-effective and environmentally sustainable electric power resources in Vermont), as well as the Northern Forest Center (a nonprofit that advocates for the Northern Forest Region and helps communities benefit from forest-based economic and conservation initiatives). 

The wood pellet boiler the Montshire has chosen for its heating system runs at a significantly higher rate of efficiency than the oil-burning boiler it replaced. It also utilizes a renewable resource that can be locally sourced, thereby supporting the local economy and a working forest products industry. Furthermore, as the states of Vermont and New Hampshire move forward with policies and initiatives aimed at increasing the use of renewable energy, the installation of the new boiler proved consistent with long-term plans for the region. 


For more information, please contact Trish Palao, Marketing & Communications Manager at 802-649-2200 x222 or trish.palao@montshire.org.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Unleash Your Curiosity at the Montshire’s Evenings for Adults

Sep 28, 2017
For Immediate Release

On Friday, October 13, 2017, the Montshire Museum of Science kicks off Montshire Unleashed, evenings for adults to let their imaginations run wild.

Science is not bound by age, and Montshire Unleashed gives grown-ups the opportunity to experience the joy of discovery that comes from a trip to the Museum—at night! Visitors can create giant bubbles, challenge their brains with mind-boggling puzzles at the Solve It! exhibition, free their inner scientist through guided experiments at the Science Discovery Lab, or just relax and enjoy the food, drinks, and music.

Whether it's a night out with friends, a special evening with a date, or a chance to meet like-minded science enthusiasts, there’s lots to explore at Montshire Unleashed.

Jasper Murdock Ale and wine from the Norwich Inn will be available for purchase, as well as food from the evening’s featured local vendor. On October 13, visitors can enjoy food from Boloco and music provided by DJ Skar.

Montshire Unleashed takes place on the following Fridays, from 7–9pm, in 2017 and 2018: October 13, November 10, January 12, February 16, March 16, and April 13.

Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is exclusively for adults 21 and over.

Admission is free for Museum members, $10 for non-members, $8 for purchases prior to the event, and $7 for employees of Montshire Corporate Associate member companies. 

For more information, visit http://www.montshire.org/unleashed.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire’s New Exhibition Offers a Fun Way to Learn about Engineering

Sep 14, 2017
For Immediate Release

On Saturday, September 30, 2017, the Montshire Museum of Science will open Playing Around: Engineering and Toys, a new exhibition that offers a fun and different way to learn about the science and technology of something we all love — TOYS! 

Playing Around feeds the imagination, engages the senses, and introduces concepts in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through the creative and entertaining act of play. This special exhibition consists of three components that explain and demonstrate engineering in distinct ways. 

  • Toys: The Inside Story - Get a close look at the inner workings and simple mechanisms commonly found inside childhood favorites. Find out just what makes Jack jump out of his box, learn how Hokey Pokey Elmo wiggles and dances, see how pulleys and wires help you etch that sketch, and discover the inside story of toys.
  • Big Blue Blocks - Shape your surroundings and create your own structures through special construction blocks. Designed by an architect, these blocks include familiar rectangular pieces, as well as shapes with holes and chutes, rods, balls, and many more. Let your creative side shine as you produce your own inventions, environments, and activities.
  • Tinkering with Tinker Toys - Explore design and engineering as you construct, experiment, and realize your own amazing creations with this classic toy. Build tall towers, complex structures, your own toy idea, or anything else your imagination conceives.

“By providing visitors with these fun opportunities for learning — from discovering the inner workings of classic toys to making wonderful new creations — we can help make these STEM concepts more familiar and a greater part of their lives,” explains Bob Raiselis, Montshire Director of Exhibits. “Plus, who hasn’t wondered how that thing inside an Etch-a-Sketch moves?”

Curated by the Montshire Exhibits team, this exhibition provides a chance for play-based learning, which is crucial to healthy brain development. Studies have shown that playing can strengthen problem-solving skills, enhance social skills, and improve fine and gross motor skills. 

Playing Around: Engineering and Toys will open on Saturday, September 30, 2017, and will run through Sunday, March 25, 2018. It will be on display at the second floor of the Montshire. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Solar Eclipse Day: An Astronomical Event That Can’t Be Missed!

Aug 15, 2017
For Immediate Release

Monday, August 21, 2017, marks the first time in 38 years that a total solar eclipse will be visible across the contiguous United States. Join space enthusiasts and astronomy educators at the Montshire Museum of Science for a day of viewing and learning about this astronomical occurrence. During this time, the moon's diameter will appear larger than the sun and block all direct sunlight. While only 14 states in the eclipse’s thin path of totality will be able to experience total darkness, other areas such as New England, will still be able to see the rare vision of a partial eclipse.

The Montshire will host a series of activities surrounding this historical event. In addition to viewing the eclipse with a refracting telescope, visitors will find out more about the sun, Earth, and the moon through hands-on lessons and demonstrations. 

Coinciding with the eclipse is the unveiling of our updated Planet Walk, a scale model of the solar system. Refreshed with brand new features, this unique outdoor trail will now display objects in the Asteroid Belt (between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter), as well as the Kuiper Belt, which includes dwarf planet Pluto. Each exhibit has been updated with new imagery and information. 

Solar Eclipse Day will include:
Astronomical Scavenger Hunt – Explore the Museum’s indoor and outdoor exhibits to complete the scavenger hunt. Exhibits include sun dials, the Granite Globe, and the Planet Walk. 

Pinhole Viewing – One of the best ways to see the eclipse is through a small hole. Through this technique, create a beautiful and unique image of the sun that can then be captured in a photograph.

Shadow Tracing – Trace your shadow to document the sun’s apparent motion across the sky, caused by the Earth’s daily rotation.

“The Hows and Whys of a Solar Eclipse” – Learn about the science behind the solar eclipse through brief interactive lessons. Lessons are scheduled for 1pm, 2pm, and 3pm. 

Planet Walk – Travel from the sun to the edge of the solar system on this newly updated one-mile trail. Journey through the solar system by visiting eleven stations with scale models, each at a distance that represents their place in our solar system. 

Activities will occur rain or shine. Solar eclipse viewing will be weather dependent. The Montshire will have solar viewing glasses available for visitors to borrow for the viewing-related activities. Participating in activities is free with admission. 

For more information, visit http://www.montshire.org/programs/detail/eclipse-day.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Climate & Culture Day: A Festival of International Understanding

Jul 20, 2017
For Immediate Release

Climate & Culture Day, Saturday, July 29, 11am–4pm at the Montshire Museum of Science. Programs included with Museum admission.

Come to the Montshire Museum of Science on Saturday, July 29, for Climate & Culture Day: A Festival of International Understanding. Discover how science, culture, and climate change intermix by participating in the Montshire’s first international project. This activity-packed day celebrates newly forged connections between the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire and the country of Bhutan.

For the past year, the Montshire has led the international collaboration Weaving Strands of Knowledge: Connecting Culture and Science to Climate Change. This global project brought together rural communities from New England and Bhutan to discuss personal stories about the impact of climate change. 

“People’s personal narratives and perceptions about climate change are important to understanding and solving the issue facing our planet,” explains Montshire Director of Education Greg DeFrancis. “We need to bring personal stories to the table to encourage conversations about our environment. By doing so, we’ll support new ways to address climate change education.”

“The idea is to see how environmental changes relate to peoples’ lives,” adds Andrew Coppens, Assistant Professor of Education in Learning Sciences at the University of New Hampshire. “We all come at this from different views and different knowledge bases. That will provide its own rich results.”

On July 29, Montshire visitors will have the opportunity to listen to many of these conversations and to start their own discussion on the impact of climate change on their lives.

Climate & Culture Day Activities

Listening Stations
Hear recordings of personal stories about climate change from Bhutan and New England.  

Story-collecting Stations, 11am–4pm
Contribute to the Weaving Strands of Knowledge project by sharing stories about your own connection to the environment and your experiences with how climate change has impacted you. 

Peace Flags, 11am– 4pm
Contribute to a community art project by decorating colorful peace flags with environmental images.  

About Weaving Strands of Knowledge
Weaving Strands of Knowledge is a collaboration between the Montshire Museum of Science, the Folk Heritage Museum of Bhutan (administered by the Tarayana Cultural Foundation), the University of New Hampshire, and Royal Thimphu College of Bhutan. This collaboration was made possible by the Museums Connect program, an initiative of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs managed by the American Alliance of Museums. 

The Montshire and the Folk Heritage Museum served as community hubs for international interaction between students at the University of New Hampshire and Royal Thimphu College. Through various virtual and in-person meetings, students from across the globe learned about storytelling, climate change, and international culture. Montshire staff and faculty and students from the University of New Hampshire visited Bhutan in May to collect stories in rural villages and towns in Bhutan. In July, Royal Thimphu College students and faculty, as well as staff from the Folk Heritage Museum and Tarayana Foundation, journeyed to the Upper Valley, where they rejoined their American colleagues and conducted interviews with local farmers, hikers, and other members of the local communities. Together they edited audio stories that showcased personal stories about the impact of climate change. 

About Museums Connect: Building Global Communities 
The Museums Connect program strengthens connections and cultural understanding between people in the United States and abroad through innovative projects facilitated by museums and executed by their communities. The program’s mission is to build global communities through cross-cultural exchanges while also supporting U.S. foreign policy goals, such as youth empowerment, environmental sustainability and disability rights awareness. Museums Connect is an initiative of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is administered by the American Alliance of Museums.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

New Exhibitions at the Montshire Museum Encourage Hands-on Science Discovery

May 05, 2017
For Immediate Release

Learn to identify and classify animal skeletons, go on an animal scavenger hunt, or test your problem-solving skills with puzzles and games. Beginning June 17, the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont will transform its second-floor mezzanine with two new exhibitions, Discovering the Natural World and Solve It!

Discovering the Natural World

Using authentic tools of scientific research, Discovering the Natural World will make learning about living plants and animals an interactive process that will surprise and delight you. Built as a connected suite of explorations and investigations, children and families have the opportunity to explore the museum like a scientist while having fun.

“The Montshire views science as an active process, which can be learned and applied,” says Sherlock Terry, Montshire’s Assistant Exhibits Director. “Activities in this exhibition allow you to use and practice the skills that scientists use, like observation, classification, and measurement.”  

A few highlights of Discovering the Natural World include:

Skeleton Science — Learn about wildlife as you examine animal skeletons. Identify and classify the bones of a beaver. Learn about animal anatomy as you compare skeletons of different animals, including fish, frogs, bats, and birds.

Magnification Station—Through the magnification of seeds, bones, insects, plants, feathers, and scales you will discover how much more you can see!

Hemlock Holmes—Solve a botanical mystery. Using the clues that Hemlock Holmes presents, solve four botanical mysteries and become a full-fledged botanical detective! While you solve the mysteries, learn about plant characteristics, and how these help botanists make identifications in the field.

Animal Scavenger Hunt—A scavenger hunt to locate animals displayed throughout the exhibition. In addition to being lots of fun, this scavenger hunt encourages careful observation, critical thinking, and detailed recording of information.

Solve It! Puzzles, Math, & Problem-Solving

Energize your brain and spark your imagination as you quest for solutions to hands-on puzzles and games. Through fun and whimsical challenges Solve It! provides opportunities to build “grit” – the perseverance and problem-solving mindset needed to succeed as a 21st-century learner.

A number of important math process skills such as making sense of problems and persevering in solving them, using abstract and quantitative reasoning, are all applied to solving puzzles and games. Solve It! empowers and encourages you to test these skills as you hunt for solutions using geometry, patterns, and math.

“Puzzles and games are learning tools that present real challenges which naturally inspire the use of math skills,” says Terry.

The puzzle and game exhibits in Solve It! are grouped together by type of challenge and strategy for solving the puzzle. Different levels of challenge within each puzzle group will provide an entry point for beginners as well as a real mental workout for experts.

Caution: The puzzles and games in this exhibition can be habit forming!

Discovering the Natural World and Solve It! are made possible in part by donors to the David Goudy Discovery Fund.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire’s Day For Science: A Community Celebration Advocating the Importance of Science

Apr 14, 2017
For Immediate Release

Montshire’s Day For Science, Saturday, April 22, 10am–5pm. Admission is free and open to all members of the community!

Join friends and neighbors Saturday, April 22 at the Montshire Museum of Science to celebrate the importance of science. While some will be marching for science, the Montshire invites the community to the Museum and engage in doing science, meeting scientists, and hear about climate science from researchers in the field.

The day will be filled with hands-on activities, lectures, and opportunities for you to share your thoughts about the important role of science in your life.

Montshire’s Day For Science, Saturday, April 22, 10am–5pm. Admission is free and open to all members of the community!

Hands-on Science and Engineering workshops, 11am–4pm

  • Dr. Vicki May, Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College will show you how to solder and make a solar powered lantern you can bring home.
  • Dr. Chris Polashenski, climate scientists with the US Army Corps of Engineering Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), will talk about his research and doing science in the arctic, and lead activities about sea ice and the earth’s energy balance.
  • Montshire education staff will lead a number of hands-on science activities ranging from climate science to exploring the natural history of northern New England.
  • Dr. Andrew Coppens of the University of New Hampshire will provide opportunities for you to record your stories about what the environment means to you, the changes you’ve witnessed over time, and how they have impacted your life.

Why Science Matters presentations, 2–3:15pm

  • Dr. Mary Albert, Executive Director U.S. Ice Drilling Program —Climate Change: What we know and how we know it.
  • Dr. Joseph Helble, Dean of the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College—The role of federal and private investments in science and engineering R&D serves society.
  • Christine Black, PhD candidate, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Dartmouth College—Science makes us human: the quest to understand our place in the universe.
  • Dr. Marcos Stafne, Executive Director of the Montshire Museum—Science matters, and so does scientific literacy: the need to engage in science outside the classroom.

 

Montshire’s Day For Science is made possible with contributions from Bill and Jane Stetson, and from Roger Sloboda, the Ira Allen Eastman Professor of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Science Matters

Mar 24, 2017
For Immediate Release

Understanding science helps us understand the world. Science gives us the tools we need to tackle local and global issues like identifying and curing diseases, developing cleaner ways to produce energy, and feeding a growing population, not to mention a wide variety of everyday experiences.

The Montshire Museum of Science and other science museums around the country have positive impacts on
the scientific literacy of the communities we serve. Science museums provide carefully designed spaces that encourage visitors and program participants of all ages to wrestle
with challenging concepts and learn about unfamiliar phenomena. In fact, communities that encourage scientific literacy can help spur scientific breakthroughs by nurturing the next generation of scientists and engineers.

Organizations like the Montshire provide a critical link between the larger scientific community and the public, and they facilitate meaningful exchanges between scientists and their local communities. The work of these organizations is as important as ever in helping to validate scientific inquiry and the use of scientific processes in decision making.

The Montshire Museum of Science was established in 1976 to nurture an interest in and curiosity about the physical and natural world. From its inception, Montshire’s staff, volunteers, and supporters believed that the development of scientific literacy and appreciation should begin
in childhood and continue through adulthood. Forty years later, we remain committed to this mission. To awaken and encourage a lifelong interest in science, we strive to spark an interest in how our world works, and then provide opportunities to deepen that understanding.

As you engage with a world in which the importance of facts has been brought into question, we encourage you to embrace science. The problem-solvers of the future will continue to rely on the ability to define key problems, gather evidence, test solutions, and communicate their ideas. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Partners with Lemon Brooke Landscape Architecture to Develop Outdoor Master Plan

Mar 03, 2017
For Immediate Release

The Montshire Museum of Science has partnered with Lemon Brooke Landscape Architecture to develop a comprehensive outdoor master plan for the Museum's 100-acre landscape. The project will provide a unified vision for the Montshire's outdoor landscape, structures, and activities, and includes an assessment of current land use, research of new outdoor experiences, and the development of conceptual designs to engage visitors in the joy of science.

The Montshire has a long history of developing extraordinary outdoor learning experiences and interactive environments. Located along the Connecticut River, the Montshire’s 100 acres include over three miles of educational trails, the interactive David Goudy Science Park which includes unique water features and physical science exhibits, and the Hughes Pavilion—a state-of-the art gathering place for programs and visitor amenities. The Montshire has been providing family and school learning experiences on the grounds for close to thirty years, and serves almost 600 summer campers a year.

As part of the Montshire’s recently-adopted strategic plan, the Museum’s leadership has outlined unique goals that will engage people of all ages in experiencing the joy of science by maximizing opportunities for discovery and elevating the Museum’s outdoor experiences. By partnering with Lemon Brooke Landscape Architecture, the Museum will map out a high-level master plan for the 100-acre landscape that focuses the Montshire’s outdoor experiences on discovery.

"We are thrilled to be working with Lemon Brooke Landscape Architecture on this pivotal project," remarks Montshire Executive Director Marcos Stafne. "Lemon Brooke has the professional experience and a personal commitment to creating inspired outdoor environments that are accessible, engaging, and imaginative. The Montshire’s 100-acres is an incredible laboratory for people of all ages to learn more about the world around them, and Lemon Brooke will guide the Museum in pushing these experiences to the next level."

“Thinking about the potential that a 100 acre museum like the Montshire has to shape a child’s imagination and their future relationship with the physical and natural world is very exciting," explains Jennifer Brooke. "We want to strengthen the Montshire’s role in the way families learn together, play together, and hopefully begin an ongoing dialogue about science in their everyday lives.” Lemon Brooke Landscape Architecture is led by Jennifer Brooke and Christian Lemon, and has completed numerous outdoor projects across the United States and abroad. Jennifer Brooke explained, " Science is the way water runs downhill, leaves fall from the trees, and shadows move across the ground. At the intersection of art and science is landscape architecture. Designers at Lemon Brooke love nothing more than sharing our sense of wonder in the natural world whenever possible, and where better than at a science museum with a passion for hands-on learning?"

The Montshire’s master planning process began in February of 2017, and the process will continue through November 2017.

About the Montshire Museum of Science:
Situated in the Upper Connecticut River Valley in Norwich, Vermont, along the Connecticut River and adjacent to Hanover, New Hampshire, the Montshire Museum of Science’s building and grounds have sparked the scientific imaginations of millions of visitors. The Montshire’s mission is to awaken and encourage a lifelong interest in science through exhibits and programming dedicated to hands-on discovery and education for people of all ages. Unique to this mission is Montshire’s 100-acre New England riverfront setting, which fosters deep and creative learning in both the physical and natural sciences. The Museum opened in 1976 and moved to its current location in 1989; it recently celebrated its 40th anniversary of serving the public.  Since its move to Norwich, the Museum has doubled its building size, blazed and interpreted three miles of trails, developed the three acre David Goudy Science Park with hands-on exhibits and seasonal water play activities, and built the outdoor Hughes Pavilion.

About Lemon Brooke:
Lemon Brooke is a landscape architecture and planning office in Concord, Massachusetts. The husband and wife founders, Jennifer Brooke and Christian Lemon, have long maintained a persistent focus on the relationship between design and human experience, knowing that it really does make a difference. That means they work diligently to create environments that are inspiring, accessible, healthy, visceral, and meaningful. Together, Jennifer and Christian have worked on award-winning projects that span a wide range of typologies, with corporate, institutional and private clients around the country. One of their recently completed projects, the Discovery Woods at the Discovery Museums in Acton, Massachusetts, won the 2017 Commonwealth Award for Access. Presented every two years by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the award honors exceptional achievement in the arts, humanities, and sciences. The Award for Access recognizes exceptional programs that make arts and culture accessible and inclusive for older adults, persons with disabilities and other underserved populations, and Lemon Brooke is very proud to have been a large part of this achievement.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science announces new partnership with the Hanover Garden Club

Dec 20, 2016
For Immediate Release

The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont and the Hanover Garden Club of Hanover, New Hampshire are collaborating to expand horticulture programming and educational opportunities in the Upper Valley.

Beginning Tuesday, January 3 the Montshire will host a monthly series of five programs offered and organized by the Hanover Garden Club. The programs, held in the Museum’s Porter Community Room, begin at 1 p.m., are open to the public at no charge.

2017 Program themes include:

  • January 3: Beekeeping— Learn how a beekeeper manages 200 colonies for honey production without the use of any chemical treatments for Varroa mites.
  • February 7: Gardens of Scotland and France— Learn about two gardens from opposite ends of the spectrum: Little Sparta (Scotland) and The Secret Gardens (France)
  • March 7: Spring wildflowers— Spring ephemeral wildflowers bloom quickly and seed before the canopy of trees overhead leaf out. Learn more about these wildflowers and how they spread.
  • April: 4: Hydrangeas— This fascinating program will include a review of the major species of hydrangeas including those of merit for the Upper Valley.
  • May 2: Container plantings— This informative program will provide ideas for combining a variety of plants for your containers.

As part of the partnership, the Hanover Garden Club will be supporting a 14-week horticultural intern in 2017 to work with Montshire’s landscape designer and horticulturist to support native plant and natural landscaping projects and exhibits on the Montshire grounds. The internship is designed to advance the education and career of a horticulture student, gardener, or landscape designer

“This partnership allows us to expand educational opportunities and programs that focus on sustainability and gardening issues specific to the Upper Valley,” said Sandra Johnson, current President of The Hanover Garden Club.

“The Hanover Garden Club has a long history of educating people about environmental stewardship and helping people connect with gardening as well as our natural habitat through their monthly programs,” says Montshire’s Director of Education Greg DeFrancis. “We hope to continue to expand people’s awareness of the natural world through programs and exhibits, indoors and out and we are delighted to collaborate with HGC to provide these programs at the Montshire.

About the Hanover Garden Club
Members of the Hanover Garden Club have come together since 1936 to promote knowledge and a love of gardening, to fund and plant the town gardens in Hanover, and to educate residents on conservation issues in this corner of northern New England. The Garden Club nourishes members’ appetites for growing and designing with plant material, with membership open to all residents of the Upper Valley.

About the Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, is a hands-on interactive science museum located on 100 acres, with more than 125 exhibits on nature, technology, astronomy, and the physical sciences. Visiting exhibitions, educational programs, and special events are offered throughout the year. The Museum’s outdoor landscape includes the Woodland Garden, trails, David Goudy Science Park, and outdoor exhibits. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas). 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

“Making Music: The Science of Musical Instruments” opens November 25

Nov 14, 2016
For Immediate Release

"Making Music: The Science of Musical Instruments", a new exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, explores the science that turns rhythms and harmonies into reality.

Music is enhanced by the instruments on which it is played. Behind the scenes of every great performance lies centuries of innovation in design, engineering, and material science. A new exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, explores the science that turns rhythms and harmonies into reality.

Making Music: The Science of Musical Instruments reveals the science behind everything from cellos and pianos to saxophones and electronic synthesizers. The 2,500-square-foot exhibition, which opens November 25, shares stories of instrument designers and musicians, and then invites visitors to play authentic instruments as well as some they’ve created themselves.

“We’re very excited to create an exhibition using real instruments that helps visitors discover the science behind the art of music making,” says Sherlock Terry, Montshire’s Assistant Exhibits Director, who led the design of Making Music.

The Museum’s new exhibition delves into four instrument families—strings, percussion, air instruments, and electronic instruments. Each section invites visitors to play instruments, and see videos of musicians who’ve mastered the art of playing their instrument. For example, the cluster on wind instruments invites people to create their own instruments by piecing together basic parts, and then test their design to better understand the age-old principles that allowed people to create flutes, clarinets, and organs.

Another section encourages visitors to control, adjust, and play a modular synthesizer designed by New Hampshire-born instrument maker Dan Snazelle. By adjusting its inner workings, people gain a better understanding of how electronic instruments make sounds that were previously impossible.

Bring friends and family to a shared band space, where visitors can play a guitar, drum set, or keyboard and experience how these complementary instruments empower groups to create music together.

Along the way, compelling stories of musicians, scientists, and craftspeople teach visitors about practices rooted in tradition – and some that spring from techniques and materials unknown just 25 years ago.

Making Music includes a range of activities designed to engage children, families, students, and adults – both as individuals and as teams. This interactive exhibition demonstrates that all instruments, from a simple flute to a synthesizer, rely on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Playful interactions stimulate questions and drive discussions during and after visiting the Museum.

This creative and practical examination of music distinguishes the Montshire as a unique place where science and art collide, and combines music and STEM principles. A recent survey of science centers and children’s museums with exhibitions about music, found no other interactive exhibit that does this. Making Music resonates with the core mission of the Montshire: awakening and encouraging a lifelong interest in science.

The Montshire enjoys a long tradition of highlighting exhibits about sound and music. Montshire’s outdoor Science Park features the reverberating Paul Matisse Musical Fence, Ned Kahn’s pebble-powered Rock Music installation, and a musical instrument made of stone known as the Lithophone. Inside, the Museum houses an organ-pipe exhibit designed for preschool audiences and the electronic Crankin’ Rhythm exhibit.

Prepare to be inspired and amazed and let your creativity flow. Making Music is free with museum admission and will run through September 17, 2017.

The Montshire created Making Music in consultation with instrument makers, musicians, materials scientists, acousticians, educators, exhibit developers, and our staff of trained science communicators. Making Music is made possible by donors to the David Goudy Discovery Fund.

Press photos available

About the Montshire Museum of Science:
The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, is a hands-on, interactive science museum with more than 140 exhibits on nature, technology, astronomy, and the physical sciences. Visiting exhibitions, educational programs, and special events are offered throughout the year. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science to work with Bhutan on climate change education

Nov 10, 2016
For Immediate Release

Montshire Museum of Science’s education director Greg DeFrancis traveled to Thimphu, Bhutan last month to plan a joint project to strengthen educational initiatives in environmental sustainability and climate change.

Joined by University of New Hampshire professor Sameer Honwad, the two planned an international exchange that will see Bhutanese and United States college students collecting personal stories about climate change to pioneer new methods to help people understand our impact on our environment. The project is part of the Museums Connectsm program, an initiative of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that is administered by the American Alliance of Museums.

Bhutan, one of the smallest countries in the world and situated in the eastern Himalayas, is noted for both its policies of gross national happiness and environmentalism. Bordering India and China, the country has seen the effects of climate change first hand, and offers examples of how a community might address issues of sustainability.  

Titled Weaving Strands of Knowledge: Connecting Culture and Science to Climate Change, the Montshire will partner with the Folk Heritage Museum located in Thimphu, Bhutan to record stories of how climate change is personally affecting residents of the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire, and Bhutan. To broaden the project’s reach, the Montshire has partnered with the University of New Hampshire and the Folk Heritage Museum in Bhutan, which is administrated by the Tarayana Cultural Foundation and will partner with Royal Thimphu College.

As part of Museums Connect, six grants with 12 museum partners for 2016 were announced this year. Museums Connect pairs museums and local communities in the United States and abroad for cross-cultural exchanges that bring people, especially youth, together.

"This is a program unlike any other," said Alliance President and CEO Laura Lott.  “Museums Connect projects create global citizens and foster deep relationships between American and global communities."

A key issue with education surrounding environmental sustainability and climate change is that even those that are knowledgeable about the scientific data struggle to communicate the impacts on everyday lives. A focus of the Montshire and Folk Heritage Museum’s project will be to seek new ways to help people understand the impact of climate change on a personal level. The project partners believe that weaving personal stories and current climate research is an important first step.

“Making science relevant is at the heart of what we do,” explains Montshire’s executive director Marcos Stafne. “Using personal stories and narratives to connect people to science helps develop a deeper layer of meaning and engagement with the world around them.”

College students, professors, and museum staff from Bhutan will visit the United States for interviews with community members in New Hampshire and Vermont. Similar visits are planned for UNH students, faculty, and Montshire Museum of Science staff in Bhutan. Students in each country will record stories of environmental change as observed by the community members, and then share these stories through public outreach and programming at each museum.

The project will culminate with two full-day environmental sustainability awareness festivals (one at each museum) using the personal narratives collected to stimulate conversations at the local, regional and global level.

“This as an important way not only to help international communities discuss common issues of science and technology, but to help us better understand how to weave personal experiences and stories together with the science of climate change to promote conversation and collective action,” says DeFrancis. “Everyone involved is really excited about this work. We also expect to use these stories in future work at the Montshire and with partners around the country.”

About the Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, is a hands-on interactive science center with more than 140 exhibits on nature, technology, astronomy, and the physical sciences. Visiting exhibitions, educational programs, and special events are offered throughout the year. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

About Museums Connect: Building Global Communities
The Museums Connect program strengthens connections and cultural understanding between people in the United States and abroad through innovative projects facilitated by museums and executed by their communities. The program’s mission is to build global communities through cross-cultural exchanges while also supporting U.S. foreign policy goals, such as youth empowerment, environmental sustainability and disability rights awareness. Museums ConnectSM is an initiative of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is administered by the American Alliance of Museums.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science selected as hub in new Making-in-Schools Initiative funded by Google

Oct 04, 2016
For Immediate Release

Google is partnering with Maker Ed and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh to support an innovative hub model that sustainably integrates making and tinkering in schools.

As part of Making Spaces: Expanding Maker Education Across the Nation, a nationwide program supported by Google, the Maker Education Initiative (Maker Ed) and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh (CMP), are partnering with Montshire Museum of Science to provide local schools with guidance, professional development, and support to jumpstart and sustain maker education in classrooms. The Montshire is excited to be building on the enthusiasm for tinkering and maker education that is surging across the country including in New Hampshire and Vermont. In particular, the Montshire will tackle the crucial topic of fundraising, working closely with local schools to launch a crowdfunding campaign, which will then help to fund makerspaces and maker programs in these schools.

Other confirmed hubs for the 2016-2017 school year include: Scott Family Amazeum in Bentonville, AR; KID Museum in Bethesda, MD; Edventure Children’s Museum in Columbia, SC; Albemarle County Public Schools in Charlottesville, VA; Digital Youth Network in Chicago, IL; and San Mateo County Office of Education in Redwood City, CA.

CMP piloted a year-long run of the program in 2015-2016 with 10 schools in Southwestern Pennsylvania that collectively raised more than $100,000 to launch maker education in their schools. Based on lessons learned during this pilot phase, CMP is designing a toolkit that will allow hubs to effectively train schools in creating crowdfunding campaigns. “We are thrilled to be able to scale this program to the national level to get more youth the resources needed to start tinkering, creating and making,” says Jane Werner, Executive Director of Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. “A unique program that began in our region can now be run by the Montshire Museum of Science to benefit youth in Vermont and New Hampshire.”

"We are excited to collaborate with partners across the country to better support making, engineering, and tinkering in northern New England’s rural schools,” says Montshire’s Director of Education Greg DeFrancis. “We have been engaging children in engineering for over a dozen years through both our school programs and summer camps. Our recent work with making and tinkering with students, teachers, and Museum visitors has allowed us to expand on these programs. For example, our 40 Schools Project last spring engaged students across Vermont and New Hampshire in engineering through the kinds of fun, whimsical, and STEM-rich learning opportunities that school-based Maker Spaces can support. The opportunity to join Google, MakerEd, and Pittsburgh Children’s Museum affirms Montshire’s role as a national leader in the field—it’s quite an honor.”

Maker Ed’s Executive Director Trey Lathe adds, "Schools are increasingly interested in maker education and establishing youth maker programs and spaces, but don't always have access to the training, resources, and community of support they need. We are excited that the Montshire will be working to expand that energy and momentum in a similar model."

About Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vt., is a nationally recognized, interactive science museum with more than 125 exhibits on nature, technology, astronomy, and the physical sciences. The Montshire's unique 100-acre riverfront setting includes the Woodland Garden, nature trails, David Goudy Science Park, and the Hughes Pavilion. Visiting exhibitions, education programs, and special events are offered throughout the year for visitors of all ages. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas).

About Maker Ed
Maker Ed is a nonprofit organization that provides educators with the training, resources, and community of support they need to facilitate engaging learning experiences with youth through maker education -- a hands-on, youth-driven, and open-ended learning approach. Through this work, Maker Ed plays a national leadership role in both broadening access to and deepening the impact of maker education for youth. Maker Ed is a project of the Tides Center, a registered 501(c)3 non-profit public charity. For more information, visit the Maker Ed website and follow @MakerEdOrg for updates.

About Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh welcomes more than 302,500 visitors annually and provides “real stuff” experiences for play, learning and fun. The Museum’s permanent exhibit MAKESHOP® was built in 2011 to create a space for children and families to make, play and design using the same materials, tools and processes used by professional artists, builders, programmers and creators of all kinds. The Museum’s maker-focused initiatives include serving as a Maker Corps site for the Maker Education Initiative, Mobile MAKESHOP, Youth Maker workshops, MAKEnight (21+) events, and presenting Maker Faire Pittsburgh 2015 and 2016.  For more information, visit www.pittsburghkids.org and follow @pghkids.

About Google’s Making & Science
Making & Science is an initiative from Google to inspire future scientists and makers. Learn more about our programs, events, media, and the new Science Journal app at makingscience.withgoogle.com.

Contact
Beth Krusi
Montshire Museum of Science
One Montshire Road
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-2200 x222
beth.krusi@montshire.org

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum opens new Tinkering Loft

Jun 15, 2016
For Immediate Release

Build your own ’bot, craft a wind-powered vehicle, team up to build a pinball machine, and ignite your imagination with giant building blocks. Beginning June 25, Montshire’s expansive new Tinkering Loft offers visitors hands-on engineering projects that are limited only by your creativity and persistence.

As part of its 40th anniversary, the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont will open The Tinkering Loft on June 25. Part exhibition and part program area, this innovative and interactive new space engages visitors through fun and whimsical challenges that spark interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). The Tinkering Loft builds on two years of successful programs that the Montshire staff has developed, tested, and refined with the help of hundreds of participants in all age groups. The 2,500-square-foot exhibition features four activity areas for different ages and levels of challenge:

  • Families with young children can explore Build It, a creative playspace filled with oversized foam blocks. Kids are free to build forts and invent their own games. This free-form area helps develop problem-solving, collaboration, and communication skills by allowing children to experiment with balance, materials, spatial relationships, and design concepts.
  • Invitation to Tinker welcomes all visitors to take on STEM challenges at their own pace. This area offers a rotating selection of projects that encourage amateur engineers to build, experiment, and iterate on their designs. For example, “Spinning Things” urges older kids and adults to construct a twirling top from nuts, bolts, washers, and cardboard, and then to improve on their design by tweaking the weight, center of gravity, and moment of inertia.
  • The Montshire’s popular Tinkering Labs make up two facilitated zones. Participants can learn about circuits, motors, balance, and structural design to assemble a personalized, jittering “Scribble Bot” or experiment with 3D architecture and LED lighting to assemble a miniature “Electric Island Village.” The Montshire team designed a series of six hands-on projects that introduce visiting tinkerers to new concepts while encouraging them to explore their own creative vision. The two Labs will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

In addition to strengthening STEM skills, The Montshire’s tinkering activities provide opportunities to build “grit” – the perseverance and problem-solving mindset needed to succeed as a 21st-century learner. When people tinker, they try out ideas, make adjustments, and discover science firsthand.

Join us June 25 through August 28 and experience the joy of science in The Tinkering Loft at the Montshire.

The Tinkering Loft is made possible with support from our Premier Exhibition Sponsor, Chroma Technology Corporation, our Exhibition Supporter, Red River Charitable Foundation, and donors to the David Goudy Discovery Fund. Media sponsorship is provided by WCAX-TV.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum chooses local artist Dan Snow to create interactive sculpture

Feb 18, 2016
For Immediate Release

As part of its 40th anniversary, the Montshire Museum of Science has commissioned Vermont artist and master stone worker Dan Snow to create an interactive sculpture that will transform the entryway of the Museum. Internationally recognized, Snow fuses innovative designs with old-world techniques to create unique works of environmental art.

The sculpture, made possible by the David Goudy Discovery Fund, will encapsulate the Montshire’s mission of engagement and discovery – signaling to visitors the excitement they will find inside the Museum and across its 100 acres, as well as showcasing the Montshire’s commitment to art and science, and the important connections between them. The 1000-square-foot sculpture will be an interactive representation of the intersection of the waves formed by drops of water into a pond—at enormous scale, and rendered in individually shaped stones.

“I believe the sight of a new dry stone construction on the land is a sign of a healthy community,” says Snow. “When loose stone is collected and arranged, conversations take place.”

Both the installation process and the finished work will spark engaging conversations among Museum visitors. The piece, which hasn’t yet been named, is designed to allow visitors to explore its form visually as well as kinesthetically by moving in and around the stone ripples.

“Dan Snow’s visionary work will spark joy and delight for Montshire visitors as they enter the Museum,” says Montshire’s Executive Director Marcos Stafne. “While the sculpture represents the waves formed by a drop of water, it is also symbolic of the ripple effect that takes place when visitors experience that “aha” moment as they engage in science, and the permanent nature of the Snow’s stonework reinforces Montshire’s enduring passion to continue encouraging these moments to happen for years to come.

Throughout the summer of 2015, a small team of Montshire staff set out the criteria for a new outdoor project. The sculpture had to be touchable and interactive, have a strong presence across the four seasons, and make connections between the worlds of science and art.

After visiting institutions and sculpture centers throughout New England, consulting with experts from the Hood Museum of Art and AVA Gallery, and working individually with three artists that were selected to submit proposals, the team chose Dan Snow’s proposal for the new sculpture adjacent to the museum’s front entryway.

Snow will work for six weeks beginning late spring to create and install the piece. The project will use locally sourced stone from Vermont and New Hampshire, a technique that he has honed over decades of work. 

Although visitors will be able to watch Snow build the piece, stone by stone, beginning in late spring, it will be late summer that the artwork will finally be unveiled for full exploration by visitors to the Museum.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science hits the road with two traveling education programs

Feb 16, 2016
For Immediate Release

As part of Montshire Museum of Science’s 40th Anniversary celebration, the Museum’s team of science educators will launch two new community outreach programs this year, bringing the wonder of discovery to classrooms and public places across Vermont and New Hampshire.

Pop-Up Science will deploy a mobile tinkering lab to 15 community sites across the Upper Valley, while The 40 Schools Project will work with upper elementary students and teachers to build engineering and art skills through whimsical and creative science projects.

“National studies show that rural kids have the least opportunity to participate in informal education programs outside of school time,” says Greg DeFrancis, the Montshire’s education director. “That’s why programs like these are so important. They get kids excited, get their hands and minds working, and get them thinking about all the ways that science intersects with their lives.”

This summer, the Museum’s Pop-Up Science lab will travel to county fairs, shopping malls, outdoor markets, and community events. Science educators and teen fellows will invite families to engage in a tinkering project. Participants can learn about circuits, motors, and balance to assemble a personalized, jittering Scribble Bot or experiment with 3D architecture and LED lighting to construct a miniature Electric Island. The Montshire team designed both hands-on projects to introduce young tinkerers to new concepts while encouraging them to explore their own creative vision. Pop-Up Science is a part of the Creativity Garden—a nationwide project of the Association of Science-Technology Centers, generously supported by Disney.

Inspired by the Montshire’s 40th anniversary this year, The 40 School Project will provide professional development, instructional guides, building materials, and classroom support to successfully implement engineering and design lessons into school curriculums. Over the past two years, Montshire’s professional educators have developed and tested more than a dozen exciting tinkering activities for students and families at the Museum. The Montshire is recruiting 5th and 6th grade teachers in 40 schools ranging from Hardwick, Vt. to Keene, N.H. At least half of the schools selected to participate will represent small, underserved, rural populations with 40 percent of the student body or more qualifying for the Federal Free and Reduced Price School Meal Program. The project is made possible with funding from the Kettering Family Foundation.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science to host Human Plus: Real Lives + Real Engineering

Jan 11, 2016
For Immediate Release

What do you get when cutting-edge science and engineering join forces to assist the human body? Endless possibilities for improving day-to-day lives and realizing lifelong dreams! Explore Human Plus: Real Lives + Real Engineering at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vt., beginning January 30.

The exhibition offers visitors of all ages the chance to explore engineering concepts and to create a range of low- and high-tech tools that extend the potential of the human body. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Human Plus showcases compelling stories from a unique field of engineering that uses science, technology, and creativity to overcome limitations and unlock every person’s potential.

"It is no longer a conversation about overcoming deficiency,” said Aimee Mullins, a Paralympic champion, actor, model, inspirational speaker, and double amputee. “It’s a conversation about potential.”

“We’re excited to be hosting the New England debut of Human Plus: Real Lives + Real Engineering at the Montshire,” said Bob Raiselis, the Montshire’s Exhibits Director. “Engineering is all about meeting challenges and solving problems, and this exhibition allows our museum visitors to learn about and to be part of the creative engineering involved in the important work of extending the capabilities of the human body.”

Every Body Plays
Throughout the exhibit, Montshire visitors will be able get their hands on a broad range of actual ability-enhancing tools. Exhibits include: a neuroprosthetic limb that can be controlled by a person’s thoughts; a virtual downhill mono-ski course; a DJ music remix station built out of a wheelchair and controlled by the wheels; a touch panel that translates songs into vibrations so visitors can feel the music; and a hands-free computer mouse, controlled through head movements, that allows a visitor to the exhibition to type messages and edit photos. Visitors can even redesign themselves in a full-body simulation and test body-enhancement technologies that supersize their strength, showcasing the new horizon of engineering that was once the stuff of science fiction.

Ask, Imagine, Create
The engineering process always begins by asking the user what they want to achieve. The exhibition poses design challenges from real-life users, such as: Can you make a tool to help someone in a wheelchair feed a pet? Or a tool that overcomes visual impairments and locates hard-to-detect obstacles? How can you design a canoe and paddles for people without arms? After viewing some of the amazing technology developed by today’s engineers, visitors will be able to put their own creativity  to the test as they build and try out their own inventions.

Compelling Stories and Videos
From busy moms and engineers, to adventurers and dance performers: people who use these new technologies—as well as the innovators themselves—share their stories through videos as well as the real-life tools they use every day. Whether they are about caring for three children or about reaching the summit of Mt. Everest, these stories captivate audiences.

Human Plus opens January 30 and runs through May 8, 2016.

Accompanying the Human Plus exhibition, Montshire Museum of Science will host four evening programs, "+TALKS," that will examine the complexities of the human body and how we can support it through engineering and community wellbeing.

The Exhibition was created by the New York Hall of Science in partnership with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry and the Quality of Life Technology Center with funding from the National Science Foundation.

Human Plus is sponsored locally by Lake Sunapee Bank, and media sponsorship is provided by WCAX-TV.

Press photos available

About Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI)
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation’s leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Ave., Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit http://www.omsi.edu.

About New York Hall of Science (NYSCI)
Built initially as a pavilion for the 1964 World's Fair, the New York Hall of Science is now New York City's hands-on science and technology center. Since 1986, NYSCI has served over seven million children, parents and teachers. NYSCI's mission is to convey the excitement and understanding of science and technology to children, families, teachers and others by galvanizing their curiosity and offering them creative, participatory ways to learn. NYSCI features the largest collection of hands-on science exhibits in New York City. Visitors of all ages can explore over 450 interactive exhibits.

About Quality of Life Technology Center
Run by Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh; The Quality of Life Technology (QoLT) Center is a National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center focused on the development of intelligent systems that improve quality of life for everyone while enabling older adults and people with disabilities. The QoLT Center addresses the needs and activities of everyday living by prototyping personal and assistive robots, cognitive and behavioral virtual coaches, safe mobility and driver assistance technologies, and human health and wellness monitoring, awareness and assistance solutions for home or community. QoLT Research emphasizes human-system interaction with attention to social, clinical and policy factors for consumer deployment and user adoption. In addition to R&D, the Center offers educational programs, commercialization initiatives and unique partnership opportunities.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science Celebrates 40 Years

Dec 29, 2015
For Immediate Release

The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, turns 40 this year! The celebration kicks off Sunday, January 10, with a free Community Open House at the Museum from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., followed by a year of special exhibitions and events.

Celebrate Montshire's 40th at the Community Open House with a day full of activities and festivities—design wearable art using LED lights, create streamers and flying contraptions for the wind tube, and craft 'science' confetti to throw when we sing “Happy Birthday Montshire”. Admission will be free all day, thanks to a donation by Peter and Jennifer Brock.

Executive Director Marcos Stafne will make some special announcements about exciting new community initiatives at 2 p.m. followed by festivities and cake.

As part of the celebration, L.L. Bean will offer snowshoe demonstrations and Morano Gelato will have a new Montshire flavor available for purchase.

“For 40 years, the Montshire has been sparking the excitement of science learning in people of all ages. We’re looking forward to a year of amazing exhibitions and programs, both inside and outside of the Museum,” says Philip McCaull, Chair of the Montshire Board of Trustees.

“Engaging our community to experience the joy of science is our greatest aim,” says Marcos Stafne, Executive Director of the Montshire, “we’ve been innovating science learning for the past 40 years on both a local and national level, and we’re excited to move full throttle into the future.”

The Montshire Museum of Science opened its doors January 10, 1976, in the former Golfside Bowling Lanes in Hanover, New Hampshire. Founding board member Allie Quinn states, “Helping the Museum get started was so inspiring. It was and continues to be such a great reminder of the power of community and grassroots organizations.” The Museum moved to its current location in Norwich, Vermont, a decade later and has grown in size and the number of people it serves. Another founding board member, Walter Paine says “we conceived the Montshire as a warm, welcoming, politically neutral place, where all ages could discover the fun of “doing science” through interaction with hands-on exhibits, mostly constructed by members of our own multi-talented staff.” Over the past 40 years, The Montshire has become one of the defining institutions of the Upper Valley, and is recognized as one of the country’s best science centers. 

As the Montshire moves into its 40th year, trustees and staff will be working on a strategic planning process for the future, involving the community through research. “We’re reaching out to hear the valuable input our greatest stakeholders have to offer,” says Marcos Stafne.

The year-long celebration continues with Human Plus: Real Lives + Real Engineering (January 30 – May 8), which showcases an innovative field of engineering that unlocks the human body’s physical potential. Visitors can ride a mono-ski in a simulated downhill race, remix music through a wheelchair-powered DJ station, and discover how a new generation of prosthetic limbs can be controlled by a user’s thoughts. Human Plus was created by the New York Hall of Science in partnership with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry and the Quality of Life Technology Center with funding from the National Science Foundation, and is sponsored locally by Lake Sunapee Bank.

A new series of programs, free and open to the community, will examine the complexities of the human body and how we can support it through engineering and community wellbeing. The events, which take place Tuesdays, March 1, 8, 15, and 22, from 6:30– 7:30 p.m. at the Montshire, are free and open the public. Topics include, The Evolution of Walking: The Perils of Bipedalism with Jeremy DeSilva, PhD, Dartmouth College; Engineering on the Inside: Innovations in Implants with Michael Mayor, PhD, Dartmouth College; Sports for Every Body with Maggie Burke, Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports; and Balancing Brains, Bodies and the Mind with Adam Pearce, Love Your Brain Foundation.

The Tinkering Loft is the Museum’s marquee summer exhibition. Based on Montshire’s breakthrough Tinkering Lab, The Tinkering Loft will provide a much larger environment to engage visitors in designing, building, and exploring STEM concepts through the creation of fun, engaging, whimsical contraptions and open-ended design challenges. The Tinkering Loft is sponsored by Chroma Technology Corporation.

This fall, uncover the facts, fictions, and fossils of Dinosaur Revolution. These reptilian role-play activities and themed mazes invite visitors to explore the talents needed to study dinosaurs and to reveal new answers to ancient questions. The learning experiences are designed to excite, motivate, and inspire interest in science among both children and adults. Science centers like the Montshire are uniquely positioned to offer learning experiences that are personally relevant, enjoyable, memorable, and impactful.

Throughout history, music has inspired creativity and allowed people to communicate on a level that words cannot. Making Music: The Science and Art of Instrument Design, created by the Montshire exhibits team, will engage visitors in learning about the design and craft of musical instruments, the science behind the materials, and the physics of the sounds they create. Making Music is scheduled to open late Fall, 2016.

Please join us as we celebrate science and innovation, and look forward to another 40 years of joyful scientific exploration. Check montshire.org for the most up-to-date schedule of exhibitions, programs, and events.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s Machine Madness has grown into a week-long engineering celebration!

Dec 09, 2015
For Immediate Release

See what can happens as you work against the clock to build an oversized, collaborative Chain Reaction Machine inspired by Rube Goldberg's designs. The Machine Madness special event is taking place Sunday, December 27 through Friday, January 1 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont. Families get to spend one hour engineering and constructing their own link in the chain reaction using materials and tools provided by the Museum. At the end of each building session, your machine will be set off by the preceding machine, go through its sequence, and then trigger the start of the next machine to make a continuous chain reaction from the first machine to the last.

Building times begin at 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 2 p.m., December 27 through January 1, with the chain reactions happening at the end of each one-hour building session. Families may sign up (first-come, first-served) at the Museum's front desk.

The final chain reaction takes place Friday, January 1, at 3 p.m. and will incorporate homemade contraptions with the successful elements created during the week. Machine Madness is free with Museum admission.

Contact mike.fenzel@montshire.org with any questions or for help getting started with your homemade machine. 

 

Press photos available

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science to receive Homo naledi specimens

Nov 02, 2015
For Immediate Release

Renowned Paleoanthropologist Lee Berger will donate cast specimens from Homo naledi, one of the most significant archaeological finds in recent history, to the Montshire Museum of Science on Tuesday, November 17 at 3 p.m.

Berger, along with Dartmouth Associate Professor of Anthropology Jeremy DeSilva, who helped analyze the bones of Homo naledi, will be presenting the specimens and leading an informal discussion with Museum visitors.

In 2013, guided by a pair of local cavers, Berger discovered ancient fossils just outside Johannesburg, deep inside the Rising Star cave, through a passage so dangerously narrow that Berger had to recruit small cavers to access them. There, 30 meters underground, in the Cradle of Humanity World Heritage site, Berger’s team uncovered more than 1,550 fossil elements, representing an unprecedented 15 individuals in what they believe to be a burial site. He named the new species Homo naledi.

“We’ve found a most remarkable creature,” says Berger. This new species appears to have intentionally deposited the bodies of its dead in the remote chamber—a behavior previously thought to be limited to humans. This new discovery is the single largest fossil hominin find in Africa to date. It shakes up our understanding of the human family tree and has the potential to transform understanding of human evolution.

Lee Berger, an Eagle Scout and National Geographic explorer-in-residence, is the Reader in Human Evolution and the Public Understanding of Science in the Institute for Human Evolution at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Jeremy "Jerry" DeSilva is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College. He is a paleoanthropologist, specializing in the locomotion of the first apes (hominoids) and early human ancestors (hominins).

To learn more about the Homo naledi discovery:
visit: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150910-human-evolution-change/

To learn more about Lee Berger:
visit: http://events.nationalgeographic.com/speakers-bureau/speaker/lee-berger/

Story on Vermont Public Radio: Homo Naledi, Which Rocked The World Of Paleontology, Comes To The Montshire

Lee Berger presentation at Montshire: https://vimeo.com/149186257

PRESS PHOTOS AVAILABLE

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum hosts The Outside Story—Artwork by Adelaide Tyrol

Oct 01, 2015
For Immediate Release

Close observation—it’s a central process in doing science, and it’s also where many artists begin their interpretation of the world.

In The Outside Story, Artwork by Adelaide Tyrol, which opens Saturday, October 17 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, Tyrol transforms her observations into images that engage us with a deeper understanding of the world around us. Museum visitors will see the results of one remarkable artist’s close observations, artistic skills, and lifelong fascination with the natural world.

 “Art presents the opportunity to reveal truths other than analytical ones,” said Tyrol. “A random moment, fully recognized, can embrace the spirit and lead us to a deeper understanding of life.”

For many years, Tyrol has illustrated articles about the natural world in Northern Woodlands Magazine, as well as for a weekly newspaper column supported by the Wellborn Ecology Fund of New Hampshire Charitable Foundation. A selection of these illustrations will be featured in the exhibition, along with more recent work, and the text of the original articles for which they were created.

The Outside Story will be on display in the Museum’s first-floor west gallery October 17 through November 29 and is free with Museum admission. 

Press photos available

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s Caterpillar Lab peeks into life on a leaf’s edge

Aug 04, 2015
For Immediate Release

A new exhibition at the Montshire gives visitors an up-close look at caterpillars—those beautiful, surprising, and, at times, icky creatures that live in our woods, fields, and backyards.

While butterflies and moths get most of the attention, caterpillars have fascinating lives of their own. Some are masters of disguise, cloaked in drab browns to look nearly identical to twigs. Others dress in brilliant greens and oranges, ready to scare off predators with a sharp hiss.

The Caterpillar Lab, on display at the Montshire August 13–18, invites visitors to learn about dozens of native species. Grab a magnifying glass or peer into a digital microscope for a face-to-face look at our roly-poly neighbors. A team of trained educators will showcase the amazing diversity of northeastern caterpillars. Learn about the funny noises they make while munching, how they grow up to become winged creatures, and why their many hind legs aren’t really legs at all.

Along with live caterpillars, the exhibit will feature a gallery of stunning photographs by naturalist Sam Jaffe. For close to a decade, Jaffe has served as New England’s chief caterpillar ambassador, capturing the marvelous lives of these wriggling, nibbling critters in images and interactive displays.

“Caterpillars are uniquely suited for use in natural history education and communicating science,” says Jaffe. “These often bizarre creatures grab and hold attention through wonder, surprise, or disgust, and thus give educators a chance to create a myriad of important learning moments and provide opportunities for discovery.”

The Caterpillar Lab is free with Museum admission.

The Caterpillar Lab at the Montshire is made possible by the Mascoma Savings Bank Foundation.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Goes Wild!

May 20, 2015
For Immediate Release

Step back in time this summer, when you visit "Prehistoric Menagerie," a group of life-size sculptures by artist Bob Shannahan.

As you stroll through David Goudy Science Park, June 1 to September 7, be on the lookout for a Woolly Mammoth with thick fur, a tiny horse that could bound like an antelope, and a seven-foot tall carnivore that has the head of a giant warthog. Each of the six species on display represented in the Prehistoric Menagerie exhibition evolved during the Cenozoic Age—the “Age of the Mammal,” the last 65 million years since dinosaurs became extinct. During this time, the world’s climate went through several changes from hot to cold, and the continents slowly moved into their current positions after the breakup of the large Pangaea continent into those we know today.

The animals of the last 65 million years reflect this dramatically changing and evolving world. North America was a continent filled with many species of mammoths, camels, rhinos, sloths, lions, horses, giant bears—and people. As the glaciers retreated 12,000 years ago after the last ice age, humans migrated here and made their home in a new land filled with prehistoric beasts.

Artist Bob Shannahan has been making and exhibiting his animals in New England for the past ten years. They are an extension of his landscape work and his work with school gardens. Though primarily self-taught, he has studied at the New Hampshire Art Institute and the Boston Institute of Art.

Shannahan remarks that making an animal starts by choosing its geologic epoch. For instance, the mammoth is an easy choice for the Ice Age. “Once I choose the animal, I conduct my research, collect skeletal measurements, and make a small model out of wire and foil, says Shannahan. “Then I make a full-size drawing on cardboard and begin building the animal. The frame, made of steel rebar and aluminum screen, is used to depict the major muscle groups. It turns out that the autumn vegetation is perfect for the animals’ fur.”

In addition to various forms of vegetation, visitors will notice other natural material used in these incredible life-size sculptures. Come meet these special visitors this summer!

Press photos available

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Announces New Executive Director

Mar 02, 2015
For Immediate Release

The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, is pleased to announce the selection of Marcos Stafne, Ph.D., as its new executive director. Stafne will fill the vacancy created by retiring executive director David Goudy, beginning April 15.

"The Board of Trustees is thrilled to welcome Marcos to the Montshire," said Cinny Bensen, chair of the board of trustees. "He is exceedingly dedicated to the informal learning that happens in museums, and is passionate about science. Marcos will bring new ideas and fresh perspectives to the Montshire, and build upon the Museum's strengths."

Upon the announcement of David Goudy's retirement, the board of trustees appointed a search committee led by the board Vice Chair Philip McCaull and engaged Kittleman & Associates of Chicago to conduct a national search.

Stafne comes to the Montshire with a wealth of knowledge and experience in the field of museums. He currently serves as Vice President of Programs and Visitor Experience at the Brooklyn Children's Museum, where he oversees education, collections, visitor services, and the planning and implementation of traveling and new exhibitions. 

He has served as the Director of Education & Visitor Experience for the Rubin Museum of Art and the Director of Public Programs & Traveling Exhibitions at the New York Hall of Science.

He has published in the Journal of Museums and Social Issues, the Museum Education Journal, and contributes to a science blog for the Huffington Post. He holds a Ph.D. in Urban Education from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and a M.A. in Theatre from Hunter College where he studied museum theatre for science and historical education.

"Cultivating and maintaining a creative community is essential for the sustainability of our future,” comments Stafne. "The Montshire has a nationally noted reputation for providing opportunities for all audiences to flex their curiosity, experience the wonder of science, and feel encouraged to try out new ideas. I am excited to guide the next phase of the Montshire’s future as we enhance and expand indoor and outdoor experiences on over 100 acres along the beautiful Connecticut River. The warmth and friendliness of the Upper Valley is palpable, and I can’t wait to get to know the community in a deeper way—especially as we grow our work with schools in New Hampshire and Vermont."

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Bubbles: Science in Soap opens at the Montshire Museum March 7

Feb 24, 2015
For Immediate Release

Ask Montshire Museum of Science visitors which exhibit is their favorite, and chances are that Bubbles will be at the top of the list. Everyone loves the Bubbles exhibition. So why is Montshire retiring this perennial favorite?

For more than a year, Montshire’s exhibits team has been developing, prototyping, and evaluating an entirely new bubbles exhibition, Bubbles: Science in Soap. The new exhibition with eight interactive stations opens at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, March 7, 2015, and will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Bubbles: Science in Soap is a completely new and re-imagined exhibition that incorporates pure experimentation, hands-on learning, and a touch of whimsy for adults and children. Visitors will delight in experimenting with surface tension, concocting new ways to create a bubble, crafting a foam sculpture, and injecting a bubble with mist.

Bubbles: Science in Soap is made possible by donors to the David Goudy Discovery Fund.

Bubbles: Science in Soap exhibition includes:

Foam Fountains—Feel, scoop, hold, and form bubble foams.
Three foam stations encourage visitors to compare different-sized foams. The foams are surprisingly light because they are made up almost entirely of air, similar to the bubbles in a bubble bath, bubbles of shaving cream, or the bubbles you see when you’re washing the dishes. Foam is a collection of bubbles.

Bubble Domes—Experiment by filling bubbles with mist.
Hold the tip of the tube in the bubble solution to make a dome, or dip the tip of the tube in the bubble solution, then raise it up to make a bubble at the end of the tube.
Try inserting air or mist into a bubble, create a bubble city, or make a bubble inside a bubble. The two stations with six hoses invite collaboration and experimentation with others.

Giant Bubbles—Pull the hoop through the air to make a giant bubble.
Gently lift the hoop to make a soap film, and see if you can form a bubble over your head, or create interesting and unique shapes. Very large bubbles are tricky to make because the soap film has to stretch extra far. Giant bubbles are actually shaped by the air around them, so they aren’t always round.

Sheet of Soap—Discover the force of surface tension while experimenting with large soap films.
Pull the rope down to make a bubble sheet. As it’s stretched, notice the rainbow-like colors that indicate the changing thickness of the soap film. See what happens when you pop part of the sheet. The surface tension that holds the molecules of soap film together pulls the string outward when the film inside the loop is popped.

Bubble Booth—Get inside a three-sided bubble.
Surround yourself in a massive bubble and try talking with a friend on the other side, or see if you can push your hand right through the bubble “walls.” Try blowing on the sheet to change the shape of the film. The soap film will stretch, making a rounded bubble. If you blow on it just right, you can cause the bubble to break free of the sheet.

Blow a Bubble—Use the blowers or your breath to make a bubble, or wave the custom-designed wands in the air.
The two bubble stations each have three blower holes, providing plenty of opportunities to make lots and lots of bubbles and bubble clusters. Hold a wand over the blower to make a bubble. Use a wand with multiple holes to make bubble clusters. Experiment with different-shaped bubble wands and bubble-blowing techniques, and invent some bubble tricks of your own.

Bubble Dropper—Enjoy a whimsical bubble-art machine that drops bowling-ball-sized bubbles from the ceiling.
Wet your hands and try to catch the bubble as it drops, or gently blow on the falling bubble—aiming for the target. The projection screens show the turbulence of the bubble solution as a bubble is formed.

Soap Shapes—Explore the math of soap film formation as wire frames demonstrate how bubbles have a geometry all their own.
Use the three different wire frames to create soap film shapes that connect in surprising ways. Observe the shape of the soap film in each frame, and then pop a part of the film to see how the shape changes. Mathematicians use computers and formulas to predict the complex shapes of soap films. These unique shapes have inspired both architects and artists.

Bubble RecipeGet information on how to mix the best bubble recipe and learn a little chemistry at the same time.
Take a recipe card home with you to make perfect bubbles and continue experimenting on your own.

Bubble Art—Take a closer look at the large wall panels for an expanded view of bubbles.
From bubble-inspired architecture and magic, to frozen bubbles, these images present a fresh take on the bubbles we see in our daily lives. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Bubbles: Science in Soap opens at the Montshire Museum March 7

Feb 23, 2015
For Immediate Release

Ask Montshire Museum of Science visitors which exhibit is their favorite, and chances are that Bubbles will be at the top of the list. Everyone loves the bubbles exhibition. So why is Montshire retiring this perennial favorite? For more than a year, Montshire’s exhibits team has been developing, prototyping, and evaluating an entirely new bubbles exhibition, Bubbles: Science in Soap. The new exhibition opens March 7, 2015, and will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Bubbles: Science in Soap is a completely new and re-imagined exhibition that incorporates pure experimentation, hands-on learning, and a touch of whimsy for adults and children. Visitors will delight in experimenting with surface tension, concocting new ways to create a bubble, crafting a foam sculpture, and injecting a bubble with mist. 

Bubbles: Science in Soap was made possible by donors to the David Goudy Discovery Fund.

 Bubbles: Science in Soap exhibition includes:

Foam Fountains—Feel, scoop, hold, and form bubble foams. 

Three foam stations encourage visitors to compare different-sized foams. The foams are surprisingly light because they are made up almost entirely of air, similar to the bubbles in a bubble bath, bubbles of shaving cream, or the bubbles you see when you’re washing the dishes. Foam is a collection of bubbles. 

Bubble Domes—Experiment by filling bubbles with mist. 

Hold the tip of the tube in the bubble solution to make a dome, or dip the tip of the tube in the bubble solution, then raise it up to make a bubble at the end of the tube.

Try inserting air or mist into a bubble, create a bubble city, or make a bubble inside a bubble. The two stations with six hoses invite collaboration and experimentation with others. 

Giant Bubbles—Pull the hoop through the air to make a giant bubble. 

Gently lift the hoop to make a soap film, and see if you can form a bubble over your head, or create interesting and unique shapes. Very large bubbles are tricky to make because the soap film has to stretch extra far. Giant bubbles are actually shaped by the air around them, so they aren’t always round.

Sheet of Soap—Discover the force of surface tension while experimenting with large soap films. 

Pull the rope down to make a bubble sheet. As it’s stretched, notice the rainbow-like colors that indicate the changing thickness of the soap film. See what happens when you pop part of the sheet. The surface tension that holds the molecules of soap film together pulls the string outward when the film inside the loop is popped.

Bubble Booth—Get inside a three-sided bubble. 

Surround yourself in a massive bubble and try talking with a friend on the other side, or see if you can push your hand right through the bubble “walls.” Try blowing on the sheet to change the shape of the film. The soap film will stretch, making a rounded bubble. If you blow on it just right, you can cause the bubble to break free of the sheet.

Blow a Bubble—Use the blowers or your breath to make a bubble, or wave the custom-designed wands in the air. 

The two bubble stations each have three blower holes, providing plenty of opportunities to make lots and lots of bubbles and bubble clusters. Hold a wand over the blower to make a bubble. Use a wand with multiple holes to make bubble clusters. Experiment with different-shaped bubble wands and bubble-blowing techniques, and invent some bubble tricks of your own. 

Bubble Dropper—Enjoy a whimsical bubble-art machine that drops bowling-ball-sized bubbles from the ceiling. 

Wet your hands and try to catch the bubble as it drops, or gently blow on the falling bubble—aiming for the target. The projection screens show the turbulence of the bubble solution as a bubble is formed. 

Soap Shapes—Explore the math of soap film formation as wire frames demonstrate how bubbles have a geometry all their own. 

Use the three different wire frames to create soap film shapes that connect in surprising ways. Observe the shape of the soap film in each frame, and then pop a part of the film to see how the shape changes. Mathematicians use computers and formulas to predict the complex shapes of soap films. These unique shapes have inspired both architects and artists.

Bubble Recipe—Get information on how to mix the best bubble recipe and learn a little chemistry at the same time. 

Take a recipe card home with you to make perfect bubbles and continue experimenting on your own.

Bubble Art—Take a closer look at the large wall panels for an expanded view of bubbles. 

From bubble-inspired architecture and magic, to frozen bubbles, these images present a fresh take on the bubbles we see in our daily lives. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s efforts to welcome low-income families exceed expectations

Feb 17, 2015
For Immediate Release

One year ago, Montshire Museum launched a major expansion of its Warm Welcome program to provide greater access to the Museum by disadvantaged children and families. More than 17,000 visits have resulted from this new program, far exceeding expectations.

High levels of participation are important for many reasons. Studies show that learning experiences that take place out of school—like those found in museums—are major predictors of children’s development, learning and educational achievement. For many young people, museum experiences help to enhance self-confidence, provide important skills, and increase motivation in school. Shared memories and learning experiences can strengthen family and social bonds.

For many years, Montshire has provided free admission passes and scholarships to families that work with local human service agencies. Despite the program’s strengths, Montshire’s staff and Board of Trustees felt that more could be done to provide an inclusive environment for people of all income levels.

“To develop our program, we reached out to local families, human service agencies and other museums for their input and guidance,” said Jennifer Rickards, the Museum’s Associate Director who oversees the Warm Welcome program. “We are really pleased that the response from the community has been so positive.”

The new Warm Welcome program offers $2 Museum admission or $15 memberships to families with incomes less than 200% of the federal poverty limit. Since Montshire expanded the program in January 2014, more than 2,500 people have visited the Museum for a one-time visit, and more than 1,200 have become members, offering them unlimited Museum visits for a year. In 2014, approximately 13% of Montshire’s 170,000 visitors came via Warm Welcome programs.

“We’ve worked hard to make the process quick, easy and respectful,” said Jennifer Rickards. “We encourage anyone who might be interested to review the eligibility criteria on our website, or to call the Museum for details.”

Montshire’s initial analyses show that Warm Welcome members have nearly identical visitation patterns as other members. This is particularly exciting because multiple museum visits have been shown to have a cumulative effect on learning, increasing the likelihood of long-term impact.

Montshire Museum’s Warm Welcome program is supported by individual donors, as well as the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation and the National Life Group Foundation.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s 23rd Annual Igloo Build

Feb 03, 2015
For Immediate Release

Have you ever wondered how an igloo is built, and what if feels like inside a structure built of snow? Come to the Montshire on Saturday, February 14, and learn how to build an insulated, sturdy house, strong enough to support the weight of a polar bear, using nothing but water and a handsaw. How can this be?  Specifications indicate that the water must be frozen into crystalline form, otherwise known as snow. 

Come experience Igloo Build, one of the longest-running traditions at the Museum. Dubbed the #1 Way to Winter Fun by Yankee Magazine (Jan ’09) and a “Top 10 Winter Event” in 2014-2015 by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce, the Igloo Build is fun for the whole family. 

The day begins at 10:30 a.m. with a demonstration. You’ll learn the structural secrets of building with snow, from making an initial snow angel to placing the final block on the dome to sawing yourself out. Then try your own hand at building an igloo! Indoor activities and presentations included throughout the day—visit www.montshire.org for program updates. (Outdoor activities are dependent on snow cover).

The Igloo Build is free with Museum admission and kicks off a week of great programs at the Montshire during February Vacation week.  Visit montshire.org

The Montshire Museum of Science is an award winning, hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, with more than 140 exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, ecology, and technology. Located on a 110-acre site near the Connecticut River, the Museum's outdoor environment is a large part of the visitor experience.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Two Upper Valley Organizations Partner to Provide Exceptional Outdoor Experiences

Jan 22, 2015
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vt. (January 22, 2015—Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont and L.L. Bean Outdoor Discovery School in West Lebanon, New Hampshire are working together to provide wonderful opportunities to explore the outdoors this winter. Twice a day on Saturdays and Sundays this winter (weather permitting) L.L. Bean's experienced instructors will demonstrate and explain all the snowshoeing basics needed to enjoy this relaxing winter activity. Then, they'll lead a guided trek along Montshire Museum's trails and explore the trailside exhibits, while sharing their knowledge of the plants and wildlife that thrive in this wintry environment.

Registration is handled through L.L. Bean. Participants also receive admission to the Montshire Museum's galleries and trails, expert instruction, and use of snowshoes, poles and gaiters.

"As a part of the Museum experience, the outdoor trails and exhibits are often overlooked during the winter,” comments Beth Krusi, Montshire Museum's Director of Marketing.  "We are delighted to work with L.L. Bean Outdoor Discovery School to provide visitors an opportunity to explore the Museum's 100-acres on snowshoes."  

"Snowshoeing is a fun and healthy sport that allows you to easily enjoy the outdoors and further explore the untouched wilderness in the winter," says Scott Ellis, L.L. Bean's Director of Outdoor Discovery Schools in West Lebanon, New Hampshire store. “We’re very excited to be partnering with the Montshire Montshire for our snowshoeing programs. Not only does the Museum have this remarkable natural resource, but people here have a huge proclivity for the outdoors and we’re really excited to be sharing this passion with the folks from the Upper Valley area and beyond.”  

About the Montshire: The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on science center located on 110 acres in Norwich, Vermont. Visitors enjoy more than 125 interactive exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, technology, and more. The Montshire is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day).

About L.L. Bean Outdoor Discovery Schools:  Since 1979, the L.L.Bean Outdoor Discovery Schools have been offering a variety of courses, trips, tours, seminars and clinics for activities such as kayaking, cycling, fly fishing, camping, hiking, stand-up paddleboarding and much more. The guiding principals have always remained the same: to promote an enjoyment of the outdoors by making it as easy as possible for people to engage in outdoor activities and to foster an appreciation and respect for our natural environment. These foundations are inherent in every program offered, whether it is a two-hour fly-casting lesson, a half-day tour or a three-day trip. Last year, over 100,000 people participated in L.L.Bean Outdoor Discovery School programs.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum brings “Hidden Life of Ants” into View

Jan 12, 2015
For Immediate Release

Small yet abundant, with complex and wildly diverse lifestyles, ants are everywhere, living lives mostly hidden from view. A new exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science brings the lives of ants into clearer focus.

With the aid of a macro lens and the insights of ant expert and photographer Mark Moffett, the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History present the world of ants. 

Farmers, Warriors, Builders: The Hidden Life of Ants will open at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, January 24 and will be on view through April 5, before continuing on a 15-city national tour through 2015. “Ants” was previously on view at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

Moffett’s macro photographs tell stories about the lives of ants—hunting, communicating, dealing with disease and agriculture—and chronicle the work of entomologists in the field. The exhibition features 39 large-scale color photographs, a three-dimensional aluminum cast of an ant nest and touchable oversized ant models.

Visitors can explore the model of a leaf-cutter worker ant that has been blown up to 50 times its actual size and learn how it uses its body to work and survive in the colony.

“What fascinated me most in preparing this exhibit is that modern humans can be much more like ants than we are like our relatives, the chimpanzees,” said curator Moffett. “With our societies of millions, only ants and humans deal with issues of public health and environmental safety, roadways and traffic control, assembly lines and teamwork, market economics and voting, slavery and mass warfare.”

A real-life adventurer who has been called “the Indiana Jones of entomology” by the National Geographic Society, Moffett has won the highest honors in exploration—the 2006 Lowell Thomas Medal from the Explorers Club and Rolex, and the Chapman Andrews Society Distinguished Explorer Award (2008). Moffett received a doctorate from acclaimed conservationist Edward O. Wilson at Harvard University and remains active in science with more than 80 peer-reviewed publications. He has written more than 25 articles for National Geographic magazine, which has featured nearly 500 of his images. He also has appeared on the Conan O’Brien Show, twice on the Colbert Report and on NPR. His most recent book, Adventures Among Ants: A Global Safari with a Cast of Trillions, won the National Outdoor Book Award. More information is available at http://www.doctorbugs.com.

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SITES has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for over 60 years. SITES connects Americans to their shared cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play. Exhibition descriptions and tour schedules are available at http://www.sites.si.edu.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, located at 10th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W. in Washington, D.C., welcomes more than 7 million visitors annually. More information about the museum is available at http://www.mnh.si.edu or by calling (202) 633-1000, TTY (202) 633-5285.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s David Goudy to Retire Spring 2015

Jan 08, 2015
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vt. (January 8, 2015)-- Montshire Museum of Science Executive Director David Goudy has announced his plans to retire the end of March 2015, following 34 years as the Museum's executive director.

During his tenure, Goudy led the Museum from a fledgling enterprise to a nationally recognized center for science learning. He has taken special interest in developing the Museum's capacity for high-quality science education particularly in the context of the special challenges of serving a rural region. Montshire has become a national model, attracting research and program support from numerous private foundations and federal agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Education (DOE), National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  

Goudy was instrumental in creating the Dartmouth-Montshire Institute for Science Education in 2002, a collaborative effort drawing upon the resources of these two leading institutions to better serve the educational needs of Vermont and New Hampshire.

Shortly after being appointed as executive director in 1981, Goudy negotiated the acquisition of 100 acres bordering the Connecticut River in Norwich, Vermont, and in 1989 the Museum moved from the former Golfside Bowling Lanes in Hanover, New Hampshire, to its current location. Under Goudy's leadership the Montshire has continued to expand its learning environment, becoming an official interpretive site for the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge in 1995, and adding the Quinn Preserve in 2001, the Leonard M. Reiser Learning Center addition and outdoor Science Park in 2002, the Woodland Garden in 2008, and the James A. and Elizabeth S. Hughes Pavilion in 2010.

Goudy has served on the executive committee of the New England Museum Association, and key committees of the Association of Science and Technology Centers. He serves as an evaluator for the Museum Assessment Program of the American Alliance of Museums. He also chaired the Visiting Committee established by the trustees of Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. He recently served as sponsor for two senior members of Montshire’s staff who were selected as fellows in the international Noyce Leadership Institute. 

He received the first annual New Hampshire Corporate Fund Award for Excellence in Nonprofit Management, and represented Montshire at a White House reception with President Clinton recognizing Montshire as the first recipient of the National Award for Museum Service.

“David Goudy has made the Montshire Museum his life’s work. Over the three decades of his vigorous and enlightened service, his stewardship has made a lasting mark,” remarked Senator Patrick Leahy. “And under David’s guidance, the museum has promoted conservation of the Upper Connecticut River and its watershed, especially through the Montshire’s partnership with the Conte National Wildlife Refuge.

“The Montshire Museum is one of Vermont’s great treasures. The Montshire offers exhibits that are both educational and interactive, for children and adults alike. Every time I have visited with Marcelle and, especially, our grandchildren, we have left thrilled and fulfilled.”

Goudy has held other community leadership positions including serving on the boards of directors for Vermont Youth Conservation Corps, Howe Library, and the Hanover Area Chamber of Commerce; the board of overseers for Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, and a member of the Science League Advisory Committee of Hampshire College, Amherst, MA. He was a founding director of the first local Internet provider, ValleyNet.

Goudy is leaving Montshire at a time of growth and financial stability for the organization. Montshire ended 2013 with close to 150,000 visitors, including more than 20,000 students.

Upon announcing his retirement, Goudy said, “I have been immensely privileged to work with superb staff and trustees as well as an engaged, supportive community. No executive director could ask for a more creative environment to support development of a community cultural and educational asset like Montshire. The Museum today is in a position of great strength, with excellent internal staff leadership capacity, creative momentum, and healthy finances. It is an ideal moment to secure new leadership to carry Montshire to yet greater levels of excellence and community service.” 

“David has provided the Montshire with many years of remarkable service and his lasting legacy is immediately clear to anyone who visits the museum. While we will miss his exemplary leadership, the Board of Trustees is fully committed to maintaining the high standards that he has established for the Montshire's educational programs, exhibits, facilities and visitor services,” said Cinny Bensen, Chair of Montshire's Board of Trustees.

During 2014 and early 2015, Goudy will actively lead several new and ongoing initiatives at the Montshire including enhancing and expanding the learning opportunities on the Montshire's 100-acre landscape, preparing for the exhibition A T. rex Named Sue and what may be the Museum's busiest summer ever, growing the School Partnership Initiative, and developing new programs which support low-income families.

Montshire's Board of Trustees has engaged Kittleman & Associates, a firm specializing in executive searches for the nonprofit sector, and specifically in museum leadership transition.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

“The Light Around Us” opens at the Montshire Museum January 10

Jan 07, 2015
For Immediate Release

Light is everywhere in our world—it is both obvious and mysterious. But what exactly are the properties of light?

The Light Around Us: Color, Reflections, and Invisible Energy, a new exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science will open Saturday, January 10. The new exhibition explores both the physics of light and how we see it. Visitors will have the opportunity to experiment with color, shadows, prisms, and the light beyond the rainbow.

Light carries information from the world to our eyes and brains. Seeing colors and shapes is second nature to us, yet light is a perplexing phenomenon when we study it more closely. The seven interactive exhibits that make up The Light Around Us exhibition demonstrate some of the common properties of light, such as absorption, reflection, refraction, and diffraction. Visitors can bend and bounce light rays using lenses and mirrors, block or change the color of everyday objects, separate white light into colors, and create shadows of overlapping color.

The Light Around Us also explores light beyond the visible spectrum, such as ultraviolet light, and how this light energy can affect our health.

We’re excited about how these new exhibits will allow visitors to interact with properties of light that they may know about but have never had a chance to manipulate” commented Exhibits Director Bob Raiselis. “Being able to see a prism breaking white light into a rainbow, bouncing beams of light off both straight and curved mirrors, observing light energy made visible – these are powerful experiences in helping visitors to understand the light that surrounds us.”

The Light Around Us: Color, Reflections, and Invisible Energy exhibition was created by the Montshire Museum with support from the National Institutes of Health, and will be on display at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, through May 10, 2015.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Take a Peek Inside Some Well-Know Toys this Holiday Season

Dec 05, 2014
For Immediate Release

December 5, 2014, NORWICH, VT—Ever wonder just how that Hokey Pokey Elmo actually wiggles and dances?  Visit Toys: The Inside Story at the Montshire Museum of Science December 13, 2014 through January 19, 2015, and peek inside some well-known toys to discover the gadgets and gizmos that make them work.

This fun exhibition examines the science and mechanics of how toys work with hands-on displays and tons of cool classic toys. First, explore the 14 different hands-on stations that illustrate the simple mechanisms in toys. From Jack-in-the-Box to Hokey Pokey Elmo®, explore the basics of pulleys, cams, gears, linkages and circuits. Then, experiment with the many different mechanical and electrical doodads that make toys so fun! TOYS is an exhibition the entire family will find irresistible.

TOYS: The Inside Story, Exhibit Descriptions

Pulley Wall
Discover pulley power at this display that invites you to explore what a pulley is and how it behaves.

The Magic Behind the Silver Screen
Ever wonder how an Etch A Sketch® works? We’ve taken the toy apart to reveal its inner-workings. See how pulleys and wires guide the drawing tip.

Pattern Tracer
Test out your manual dexterity by tracing patterns on this gigantic Etch A Sketch®.

Big Pulley, Little Pulley
Create crazy optical illusions by connecting pulleys. Movable pulleys allow endless combinations and encourage discoveries about the relationship between pulley size, speed, and power.

Circuit Wall
These exhibits keep you current with the basics of circuits, switches, and circuit boards. Challenge yourself to keep a circuit open as you move a ring along an angled rod. Now you know why it takes a steady hand to win at the classic game Operation®!

Circuit Challenge
This giant circuit board is alive with fans, lights, and funny sounds. Can you make all of the circuits active at once?

Cam Wall
Cam you turn it? In this exhibit, rotating cams will make a frog jump, a gator bite, or a firefly flash. Look inside the classic Dr. Duck® toy to see how a cam lets him walk the walk.

Linkages Wall
Many toys include linkages that connect moving parts. Operate a Hungry Hippo® and a model of the inner workings of the charming Pudgy the Piglet® to see how you or a motor can turn a simple motion into one that’s more complex.

Gears Wall
You see gears in just about any machine with moving parts, including lots of popular toys! Gears are wheels with teeth. If two gears mesh, and you turn one, the other turns. But that’s just the start of what a gear can do.

Gears at Play
Movable gears on a big table can set all sorts of magical things in motion. Can you figure out how to use different sized gears to make the carousel or twirling ballerinas spin as fast as possible?

Big Gear, Little Gear
Crank it up and see how an industrial- size gear train can change the speed at which a shaft rotates.

What’s Inside the Hokey Pokey?
Hokey Pokey Elmo® loses his red fur and his plastic skin to reveal the source of his killer dance moves. Check out the motor, cam, circuit board, and switches that make Elmo dance.

What’s Inside the Marching Machine?
You can see right through Mr. Machine®, a classic toy from the 60’s made of clear plastic. The accompanying video highlights some of the linkages and cams that make him move. (See the original 1960 Mr. Machine® commercial, too!)

What’s Inside Jack-in-the-Box?
What makes Jack jump? Turn the crank on a real Jack-in-the-Box and watch live by video camera as the worm gear and cam mechanism turn him loose.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Only Owls Exhibition Opens at the Montshire Museum September 13

Aug 29, 2014
For Immediate Release

Norwich, Vt, August 29, 2014—Owls are magnificent creatures with exceptional characteristics. They have long been symbols of wisdom and knowledge in our culture, and seem to radiate a sense of mystery, wisdom, and all-knowing—fascinating humans for centuries. 

Their distinctive attributes—eyes that enable keen vision used to hunt at dawn and dusk; peculiar facial discs that direct sound to ears on the sides of their heads; unique feather structure that allows nearly silent flight; and more—make them ideal subjects for artistic interpretation.

Only Owls exhibition, opening at the Montshire Museum  Saturday September 13, 2014, brings together an array of artistic representations of these remarkable raptors in pencil, charcoal, ink, watercolor, and woodcut. All artwork is drawn from the Woodson Art Museum’s collection.

Each artwork provides insight into the fascinating world of owls and demonstrates a variety of stylistic approaches by thirty artists, including Leonard Baskin, Arthur Singer, Don Richard Eckelberry, Tony Angell, and Bart Walter.

Only Owls is from the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin, and will be on display at the Montshire Museum of Science September 13 through December 7, 2014.

Interesting facts about owls:

  • A group of owls is called a parliament. Baby owls are called owlets.
  • Owls have the ability to turn their heads 270 degrees. Their necks contain 14 vertebrae, rather than the seven found in most other birds.
  • Owls are the birds most similar to humans because all owls have upright posture and forward-facing eyes that give them binocular vision.
  • Owls have three eyelids: one for blinking, one for sleeping, and one for keeping their eyes clean and healthy.
  • There are over 150 species of owls in the world, but only 19 species are found in North America.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Release of “Dinosaur 13” Creates Buzz about “A T. rex Named Sue” at the Montshire Museum

Aug 20, 2014
For Immediate Release

Norwich, Vt, August 20, 2014— No dinosaur in the world compares to SUE—the largest, most complete, and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered. The release of the documentary Dinosaur13 last week has sparked new interest in A T. rex Named Sue at the Montshire Museum of Science through September 7, 2014.

The exhibition, A T. rex Named Sue, has been amazing visitors at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont since it opened May 17, and setting new attendance records. Featuring SUE the T. rex, the exhibition brings to life in a visceral experience combining visual, tactile, audible, and aromatic activities with compelling educational content.

SUE was a Tyrannosaurus rex that roamed North America about 67 million years ago, one of the last dinosaur species and one of the largest flesh-eaters ever to have inhabited the Earth. The “tyrant lizard king,” with its extraordinarily powerful jaws and massive serrated steak-knife teeth, still dominates popular perceptions of the Age of Dinosaurs.

The story of SUE's discovery begins in the summer of 1990. At the time, fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson was working at a dig site near Faith, South Dakota, with a commercial fossil-collecting team from the Black Hills Institute, led by Peter Larson.

Early on the morning of August 12, the team discovered that one of their trucks had a flat tire, so they headed to town for repairs. Sue elected to stay behind, and instead, she hiked out to an eroding bluff she’d noticed several days earlier.

Within minutes, she spied some bone fragments that had rolled down the incline. Looking up, she spotted several vertebrae (backbones) sticking out of the bluff face.

Sue immediately identified them as the bones of a large carnivorous dinosaur and suspected that they might be from a Tyrannosaurus rex. When the team returned, they confirmed her find and promptly named it "SUE" in her honor.

Dinosaur13 is the true tale of the ten-year battle with the U.S. government, powerful museums, Native American tribes, and competing paleontologists that found Peter Larson of the Black Hills Institute not only fighting to keep their dinosaur but fighting for their freedom as well.

A T. rex Named Sue was created by the Field Museum, Chicago, and made possible through the generosity of McDonald’s Corporation. Local sponsorship is provided by Geokon, as well as Lake Sunapee Bank, and King Arthur Flour. Media sponsorship is provided by WCAX and NHPR.

Download press photos

About Dinosaur13

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Audio Story Captures Impact of Montshire’s School Partnership Initiative

Aug 19, 2014
For Immediate Release

 Norwich, Vt, August 20, 2014— The pop students hear when salt melts ice is the sound of discovery. It was recorded by science journalist Ari Daniel at Thetford Elementary School last year. Ari produces “Museums Beyond Museums,” an audio series that explores innovative museum-based approaches to science learning and community engagement.  Supported by the Noyce Leadership Institute, an initiative of the Noyce Foundation (Los Altos, California), “Museums Beyond Museums” captures the impact of Montshire’s School Partnership Initiative (SPI) through the voices of children and teachers who actively participate in the program.

The Montshire initiative supports science education in the region’s rural K-8 schools through a long-term, collaborative partnership that brings the Museum’s experience and resources directly into classrooms. Museum educators work with teachers and administrators to build capacity and infrastructure for high-quality science programs that engage and excite students.

“Many school districts in rural New England are too small to support the infrastructure needed for outstanding science programs,” says Greg DeFrancis, Director of Education at the Montshire. “We’re able to provide on-going support to sustain and build programs that get students and teachers engaged in doing science.”  That support is delivered through a number of services that include:

  • providing professional development for faculty,implementing high-quality science curriculum materials in classrooms,
  • model teaching,
  • developing teacher-leaders for science, and
  • creating opportunities for community and family involvement in science.

The need to improve the country’s STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education system is well documented—ranging from U.S. student scores on international math and science assessments to the forecasted growth in STEM-related industries. Numerous studies show that student attitudes towards science are strongly influenced by their experiences in the science classroom and the quality of science teaching provided.

With our small rural schools facing particular challenges due to their size, isolation, and lack of internal support structures for science, Montshire’s SPI provides a unique solution to meet this need.

The program is making a difference. Participating schools are spending more time teaching science, teachers are building confidence in subject matter and teaching methods, and students’ interest and excitement about science are increasing.

Download audio segment
https://www.montshire.org/images/uploads/school-partnership-Initiative-audio-story.mp3

About the Montshire Museum
The Montshire Museum in Norwich, Vermont, is a leader in hands-on, inquiry-based learning. Its exhibits and programs are designed to inspire a love of learning and scientific exploration, engaging nearly 140,000 people each year. Many of the 17,000 schoolchildren who visit each year participate in the Museum’s educational workshops.

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Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Efficiency Vermont and Montshire Museum of Science have a great offer for Vermonters

Apr 09, 2014
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vermont (April 9, 2013) — Efficiency Vermont is offering Vermont residents over the age of 18 a coupon for 50% off admission to Montshire Museum's current visiting exhibition: Sustainable Shelter, Dwelling within the Forces of Nature.

Shelter is a universal human need—a need we share with other living things. Since buildings consume lots of resources and almost half of all the energy used in the United States it's important that we make them more efficient. But how do we take concepts and ideas and put them into action?

Sustainable Shelter, Dwelling within the Forces of Nature, currently on display at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, provides visitors with a better understanding of innovative home technologies and strategies that can help restore the health and viability of natural systems. Through hands-on exhibits, visitors will get the chance to try different ways to make their homes more energy efficient and environmentally sustainable.

Efficiency Vermont can help you take what you learn from the Sustainable Shelter exhibit and put it into action. Efficient homes are more comfortable - warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer – and they reduce energy costs over the long term. Whether you're making home improvements or simply shopping for light bulbs, there are a range of energy-efficient products and services available that can help to lower your energy bills.

"This exhibit brilliantly demonstrates many important concepts and technologies in energy-efficient building and design,” said Jim Merriam, Director of Efficiency Vermont. "We are excited to help bring more Vermonters to the Montshire Museum this April, so they can experience the exhibit firsthand, and explore ways to apply its concepts in their own homes."

"We are delighted to partner with Efficiency Vermont," says Montshire's executive director David Goudy. "The Sustainable Shelter exhibit provides rich concepts and information and Efficiency Vermont offers people the tools to put the concepts into action."

The Montshire Museum in Norwich, Vermont is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sustainable Shelter will be on display through May 26, 2014.

Vermonters—visit montshire.org for more information about Sustainable Shelter exhibition, and http://www.formstack.com/forms/mms-home_efficiency_discount to receive your coupon for 50% off adult admission to the Montshire. (Good for up to two adults from the same household.)  

Efficiency Vermont was created by the Vermont Legislature and the Vermont Public Service Board to help all Vermonters reduce energy costs, strengthen the economy, and protect Vermont's environment. For more information, contact Efficiency Vermont at 888-921-5990 or visit www.efficiencyvermont.com.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Imagine an Exhibition that Took 67 Million Years to Create!

Mar 31, 2014
For Immediate Release

"A T. rex Named Sue" is Coming to the Montshire Museum of Science May 17.

The most iconic dinosaur that ever lived is on its way to the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont. The exhibit, “A T. rex Named Sue,” scheduled to open May 17, 2014, features a cast of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered. At 42-feet long, 3,500 pounds, and 12 feet tall at the hips, this fully articulated cast skeleton is the keystone piece of this traveling exhibition which also includes replicated dinosaur fossils, video footage, free-standing interactive exhibits and colorful graphics.

Montshire visitors will be able to get hands-on with replicas of Sue’s arm bone, tail, rib and teeth, engage in interactive activities, learn how the T. rex saw, ate and sniffed out prey, and view footage showing the changing perceptions of T. rex over the past hundred years.

Sue is the largest and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever unearthed and is one of the most significant fossil finds to date. Fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson found the specimen in 1990 in the Hell Creek Formation near Faith, South Dakota. In 1997, the Field Museum purchased the 67-million-year-old fossil at auction for $8.4 million, setting the world record for the highest price ever paid for a fossil.

Only four T. rex specimens containing more than 60% of their original skeleton have been found. Sue is at least 90% complete—only a foot, one arm, and a few ribs and vertebrae are missing. Because of its near completeness, the specimen has presented the scientific community with a variety of new evidence, and with it Field Museum scientists made important new discoveries about the biology and evolution of Tyrannosaurus rex.

Sue will be assembled in Montshire's Main gallery and offers visitors the chance to discover what these professionals have learned.

The discovery of Sue ranks as one of the most important fossil finds ever, with tremendous educational value for scientists and the general public. Tyrannosaurus rex is the most widely recognized dinosaur in the world. Although it was first named almost a century ago, much remains to be understood about this remarkable animal. Carnivorous dinosaurs recently described from the Southern Hemisphere are of similar, or perhaps slightly larger size, but T. rex remains one of the largest flesh-eaters to have ever inhabited the Earth. With its extraordinarily powerful jaws and massive serrated steak-knife teeth, T. rex still dominates popular perceptions of the Age of Dinosaurs.

The exhibit “A T. rex Named Sue” runs from May 17 through September 7, 2014 at the Montshire Museum of Science. It is the first time the exhibition has been to northern New England.

This exhibit was created by the Field Museum, Chicago, and made possible through the generosity of McDonald’s Corporation. Local sponsorship is provided by Geokon, as well as Lake Sunapee Bank, and King Arthur Flour. Media sponsorship is provided by WCAX and NHPR.

Admission to "A T. rex Named Sue" is free with Museum admission. $16 for adults, $13 for children 2-17, and free for Montshire members and children under 2 years of age.

PRESS PHOTOS AVAILABLE

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science Expands Warm Welcome Program for Low-income Families

Mar 03, 2014
For Immediate Release

The Montshire Museum of Science announces a major expansion of its Warm Welcome program, enhancing a longstanding series of initiatives designed to ensure that Museum visits are accessible to low-income families.

Montshire is now offering $2/person admission and $15 memberships to any family who shows an EBT or Medicaid Card, or a letter confirming their participation in the Free or Reduced Price School Meals Program. Montshire encourages eligible families to use these opportunities to visit the Museum frequently.

Before launching this major expansion of the program in late January, Montshire officials initiated a series of conversations with human service providers, local families, and schools. The response has been enormously positive so far, with dozens of families taking advantage of the new opportunities to visit.

“I am very grateful to everyone who provided feedback and advice in the development of this initiative,” said Jennifer Rickards, Associate Director, who has spearheaded the program. “We are delighted that so many local families are excited about the opportunity to visit and engage with the Montshire.”

This new initiative has been made possible with support from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation.

About the Warm Welcome Program
The Montshire is committed to ensuring that meaningful learning experiences are accessible to disadvantaged children and families. Studies show that science museums are critically important elements of our educational infrastructure. People who are disadvantaged economically are less likely to have access to opportunities found in places like museums, which substantially undermines their learning and chances for school success. Montshire’s Warm Welcome is designed to address this challenge through a series of specific programs (such as those described below), and by offering Museum admission and education programs at fees that are set below the actual cost.

  • Free admission passes distributed to 110 human service organizations
  • Scholarships for Montshire Summer Camp and other programs
  • Special fees for schools, including a $2/student program in winter

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s David Goudy to Retire Spring 2015

Jan 28, 2014
For Immediate Release

Montshire Museum of Science Executive Director David Goudy has announced his plans to retire in March 2015, following 34 years as the Museum's executive director.

NORWICH, Vt. (January 28, 2014)-- Montshire Museum of Science Executive Director David Goudy has announced his plans to retire in March 2015, following 34 years as the Museum's executive director.

During his tenure, Goudy led the Museum from a fledgling enterprise to a nationally recognized center for science learning. He has taken special interest in developing the Museum's capacity for high-quality science education particularly in the context of the special challenges of serving a rural region. Montshire has become a national model, attracting research and program support from numerous private foundations and federal agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Education (DOE), National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  

Goudy was instrumental in creating the Dartmouth-Montshire Institute for Science Education in 2002, a collaborative effort drawing upon the resources of these two leading institutions to better serve the educational needs of Vermont and New Hampshire.

Shortly after being appointed as executive director in 1981, Goudy negotiated the acquisition of 100 acres bordering the Connecticut River in Norwich, Vermont, and in 1989 the Museum moved from the former Golfside Bowling Lanes in Hanover, New Hampshire, to its current location. Under Goudy's leadership the Montshire has continued to expand its learning environment, becoming an official interpretive site for the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge in 1995, and adding the Quinn Preserve in 2001, the Leonard M. Reiser Learning Center addition and outdoor Science Park in 2002, the Woodland Garden in 2008, and the James A. and Elizabeth S. Hughes Pavilion in 2010.

Goudy has served on the executive committee of the New England Museum Association, and key committees of the Association of Science and Technology Centers. He serves as an evaluator for the Museum Assessment Program of the American Alliance of Museums. He also chaired the Visiting Committee established by the trustees of Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. He recently served as sponsor for two senior members of Montshire’s staff who were selected as fellows in the international Noyce Leadership Institute. 

He received the first annual New Hampshire Corporate Fund Award for Excellence in Nonprofit Management, and represented Montshire at a White House reception with President Clinton recognizing Montshire as the first recipient of the National Award for Museum Service.

“David Goudy has made the Montshire Museum his life’s work. Over the three decades of his vigorous and enlightened service, his stewardship has made a lasting mark,” remarked Senator Patrick Leahy. “And under David’s guidance, the museum has promoted conservation of the Upper Connecticut River and its watershed, especially through the Montshire’s partnership with the Conte National Wildlife Refuge.

“The Montshire Museum is one of Vermont’s great treasures. The Montshire offers exhibits that are both educational and interactive, for children and adults alike. Every time I have visited with Marcelle and, especially, our grandchildren, we have left thrilled and fulfilled.”

Goudy has held other community leadership positions including serving on the boards of directors for Vermont Youth Conservation Corps, Howe Library, and the Hanover Area Chamber of Commerce; the board of overseers for Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, and a member of the Science League Advisory Committee of Hampshire College, Amherst, MA. He was a founding director of the first local Internet provider, ValleyNet.

Goudy is leaving Montshire at a time of growth and financial stability for the organization. Montshire ended 2013 with close to 150,000 visitors, including more than 20,000 students.

Upon announcing his retirement, Goudy said, “I have been immensely privileged to work with superb staff and trustees as well as an engaged, supportive community. No executive director could ask for a more creative environment to support development of a community cultural and educational asset like Montshire. The Museum today is in a position of great strength, with excellent internal staff leadership capacity, creative momentum, and healthy finances. It is an ideal moment to secure new leadership to carry Montshire to yet greater levels of excellence and community service.” 

“David has provided the Montshire with many years of remarkable service and his lasting legacy is immediately clear to anyone who visits the museum. While we will miss his exemplary leadership, the Board of Trustees is fully committed to maintaining the high standards that he has established for the Montshire's educational programs, exhibits, facilities and visitor services,” said Cinny Bensen, Chair of Montshire's Board of Trustees.

During 2014 and early 2015, Goudy will actively lead several new and ongoing initiatives at the Montshire including enhancing and expanding the learning opportunities on the Montshire's 100-acre landscape, preparing for the exhibition A T. rex Named Sue and what may be the Museum's busiest summer ever, growing the School Partnership Initiative, and developing new programs which support low-income families.

In anticipation of a national search for Goudy's replacement, Montshire's Board of Trustees has engaged Kittleman & Associates, a firm specializing in executive searches for the nonprofit sector, and specifically in museum leadership transition.

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Press photos available

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Sustainable Shelter: Taking Cues from Nature

Jan 10, 2014
For Immediate Release

What can we learn from nature to make our dwellings a sustainable part of the earth’s natural environment?

What can we learn from nature to make our dwellings a sustainable part of the earth’s natural environment? Shelter is a universal human need—and a need humans share with other living things. Because buildings consume lots of resources and almost half of all the energy used in the United States, it’s important for us to make them more efficient.

Visitors will see innovative home-building technologies and learn about strategies that can help restore the health and viability of natural systems in Sustainable Shelter: Dwelling within the Forces of Nature, at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vt., February 1 through May 26, 2014. The exhibition explores biodiversity, human and animal architecture, ecosystems, and energy and water conservation—all from the perspective of the “home.”

Just as birds select and gather materials from their local environment to fashion safe and nurturing nests, humans use natural resources to build homes to meet an array of needs and desires. But although shelters in the animal kingdom work in tandem with natural cycles, human shelters typically consume more than they need in natural resources. Sustainable Shelter investigates the way human dwellings extract, use, and discard energy, water, and other natural resources.

Through graphics, cartoons, interactive computer games, model homes, and mock shelters, visitors can explore how ordinary activities—such as reading a book or drying clothes—impact the planet’s carbon and water cycles. The exhibit also compares human dwellings with those of other animals, offers a cross-cultural look at human dwellings from around the world, and examines the changes in building methods and consumption patterns of U.S. houses over the past 150 years. Visitors will also get the chance to try out ways to make their own home more energy efficient and environmentally sustainable with hands-on exhibits. Children will enjoy the many interactive features of the exhibit, including the opportunity to poke their heads into an oversized terrarium, two at a time.

Sustainable Shelter: Dwelling within the Forces of Nature was produced by the Center for Sustainable Building Research, and the Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota. Major funding for the exhibition was provided by the United States Department of Energy.

Sustainable Shelter: Dwelling within the Forces of Nature includes the following:

• Forces of Nature Theater
• Animal Nests and Structures
• Diversity of Shelter Wall
• Carbon Cycle Animation
• Energy Flow Projection Wall
• Home Energy Game
• Life Cycle of a House
• Energy Use in Homes
• Water Use in Homes
• Life Cycles of Common Building Materials
• Sustainability Research Mini-Theater
• Diversity of Wall Systems
• Compare Typical to Sustainable Construction
• Water and Energy Interactive Displays
• Models of Typical Houses Over Time
• Build Your Own Sustainable Home Activity
• Life-sized Ant Colony and Termite Mound
• Living Mini-Biosphere 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

World’s largest T. rex specimen to be displayed at the Montshire Museum of Science

Dec 20, 2013
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vermont (December 20, 2013) — The most iconic dinosaur that ever lived is on its way to the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont. The exhibit, “A T. rex Named Sue,” scheduled to open May 17, features a cast of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered. At 42-feet long, 3,500 pounds, and 12 feet tall at the hips, this fully articulated cast skeleton is the keystone piece of this traveling exhibition which also includes replicated dinosaur fossils, a dig pit, video footage, free-standing interactive exhibits and colorful graphics.

Montshire visitors will be able to get hands-on with replicas of Sue’s arm bone, tail, rib and teeth, engage in interactive activities, learn how the T. rex saw, ate and sniffed out prey, and view footage showing the changing perceptions of T. rex over the past hundred years.

Sue is the largest and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever unearthed and is one of the most significant fossil finds to date. Fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson found the specimen in 1990 in the Hell Creek Formation near Faith, South Dakota. In 1997, the Field Museum purchased the 67-million-year-old fossil at auction for $8.4 million, setting the world record for the highest price ever paid for a fossil.

Only four T. rex specimens containing more than 60% of their original skeleton have been found. Sue is at least 90% complete—only a foot, one arm, and a few ribs and vertebrae are missing. Because of its near completeness, the specimen has presented the scientific community with a variety of new evidence, and with it Field Museum scientists made important new discoveries about the biology and evolution of Tyrannosaurus rex.

Sue will be assembled in Montshire's Main gallery and offers visitors the chance to discover what these professionals have learned.

The discovery of Sue ranks as one of the most important fossil finds ever, with tremendous educational value for scientists and the general public. Tyrannosaurus rex is the most widely recognized dinosaur in the world. Although it was first named almost a century ago, much remains to be understood about this remarkable animal. Carnivorous dinosaurs recently described from the Southern Hemisphere are of similar, or perhaps slightly larger size, but T. rex remains one of the largest flesh-eaters to have ever inhabited the Earth. With its extraordinarily powerful jaws and massive serrated steak-knife teeth, T. rex still dominates popular perceptions of the Age of Dinosaurs.

The exhibit “A T. rex Named Sue” runs from May 17 through September 7, 2014 at the Montshire Museum of Science.

This exhibit was created by the Field Museum, Chicago, and made possible through the generosity of McDonald’s Corporation.

Admission to "A T. rex Named Sue" is free with Museum admission. $16 for adults, $14 for children 2-17, and free for members and children under 2 years of age.

PRESS PHOTOS AVAILABLE

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Responds to the Needs of Our Community

Nov 27, 2013
For Immediate Release

The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, will be participating in a food drive for the Upper Valley Haven in White River Junction December 1-19, 2013, as part of the "19 Days of Norwich—1% for the Haven campaign."  In addition to asking our visitors to bring a non-perishable food item to the Museum during this time, the Montshire will donate 100 admission passes to the Haven's food shelf recipients. Each pass admits two people.

”We are very pleased to participate in this effort to support the Upper Valley Haven,” said Jennifer Rickards, Associate Director of the Montshire Museum. “For many years, Montshire has provided admission passes to guests of the Haven, and we’re looking forward to supporting customers of the food shelf as well.”

More than 35 businesses and organizations in Norwich, Vermont are donating a percentage of sales, conducting food drives, or directly supporting the Upper Valley Haven, December 1-19, 2013. Now more than ever, shopping local helps support our community.

About the Haven—The Upper Valley Haven is a non-profit, private organization that serves people struggling with poverty by providing food, shelter, education, clothing and support.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Get Ready…Get Set…GO PLAY!

Nov 19, 2013
For Immediate Release

Ever wonder just how that Hokey Pokey Elmo actually wiggles and dances? Visit "Toys: The Inside Story" at the Montshire Museum of Science December 7, 2013 through January 14, 2014, and peek inside some well-known toys to discover the gadgets and gizmos that make them work.

TOYS: The Inside Story is a totally fun exhibition that examines the science and mechanics of how toys work with hands on displays and tons of cool classic toys. First, explore the 14 different hands-on stations that illustrate the simple mechanisms in toys. From Jack-in-the-Box to Hokey Pokey Elmo®, learn about the basics of pulleys, cams, gears, linkages and circuits. Then, experiment with the many different mechanical and electrical doodads that make toys so fun! TOYS is an exhibition the entire family will find irresistible.

TOYS: The Inside Story Exhibit Descriptions

Pulley Wall
Discover pulley power at this display that invites you to explore what a pulley is and how it behaves.

The Magic Behind the Silver Screen
Ever wonder how an Etch A Sketch® works? We’ve taken the toy apart to reveal its inner-workings. See how pulleys and wires guide the drawing tip.

Pattern Tracer
Test out your manual dexterity by tracing patterns on this gigantic Etch A Sketch®.

Big Pulley, Little Pulley
Create crazy optical illusions by connecting pulleys. Movable pulleys allow endless combinations and encourage discoveries about the relationship between pulley size, speed, and power.

Circuit Wall
These exhibits keep you current with the basics of circuits, switches, and circuit boards. Challenge yourself to keep a circuit open as you move a ring along an angled rod. Now you know why it takes a steady hand to win at the classic game Operation®!

Circuit Challenge
This giant circuit board is alive with fans, lights, and funny sounds. Can you make all of the circuits active at once?

Cam Wall
Cam you turn it? In this exhibit, rotating cams will make a frog jump, a gator bite, or a firefly flash. Look inside the classic Dr. Duck® toy to see how a cam lets him walk the walk.

Linkages Wall
Many toys include linkages that connect moving parts. Operate a Hungry Hippo® and a model of the inner workings of the charming Pudgy the Piglet® to see how you or a motor can turn a simple motion into one that’s more complex.

Gears Wall
You see gears in just about any machine with moving parts, including lots of popular toys! Gears are wheels with teeth. If two gears mesh, and you turn one, the other turns. But that’s just the start of what a gear can do.

Gears at Play
Movable gears on a big table can set all sorts of magical things in motion. Can you figure out how to use different sized gears to make the carousel or twirling ballerinas spin as fast as possible?

Big Gear, Little Gear
Crank it up and see how an industrial- size gear train can change the speed at which a shaft rotates.

What’s Inside the Hokey Pokey?
Hokey Pokey Elmo® loses his red fur and his plastic skin to reveal the source of his killer dance moves. Check out the motor, cam, circuit board, and switches that make Elmo dance.

What’s Inside the Marching Machine?
You can see right through Mr. Machine®, a classic toy from the 60’s made of clear plastic. The accompanying video highlights some of the linkages and cams that make him move. (See the original 1960 Mr. Machine® commercial, too!)

What’s Inside Jack-in-the-Box?
What makes Jack jump? Turn the crank on a real Jack-in-the-Box and watch live by video camera as the worm gear and cam mechanism turn him loose. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Vets and Active Military Visit the Montshire Museum for only $2 on Veterans Day, November 11, 2013.

Oct 24, 2013
For Immediate Release

In an effort to thank our United States Military for their service, the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, is offering $2 admission (regularly $14) for Veterans, Active Duty personnel, Reserves members, National Guard members, military retirees, and one guest. Military ID or proof of service required.

"We are truly grateful to our veterans and military personnel for their service and sacrifice," said Jennifer Rickards, associate director, Montshire Museum. "We look forward to welcoming them to the Montshire." 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Please Excuse the Crates

Sep 07, 2013
For Immediate Release

The Montshire is undergoing a transformation September 9-13 as we change exhibits.

We will be taking down the Playing with Time exhibition on the first floor, and installing  From the Mountains to the Sea in the second floor gallery. And, we will be re-installing the Bubbles exhibits on the first floor.

As a reminder, the water is off in Science Park through September 28 for repairs, but the rest of Science Park is open for exploration.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

The Museum will remain open and visitors are welcome to enjoy the aquarium area, Andy's Place, much of the second floor, the tower, and the outdoor exhibits and trails.

From the Mountains to the Sea: Plants Trees, and Shrubs of New England, opens Saturday, September 14, 2013.
 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

From the Mountains to the Sea: Plants, Trees, and Shrubs of New England

Aug 20, 2013
For Immediate Release

"From the Mountains to the Sea" opens at the Montshire Museum of Science September 14, 2013.

Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, welcomes visitors to the first traveling exhibition of The New England Society of Botanical Artists (NESBA) September 14 through December 1, 2013. From the Mountains to the Sea: Plants, Trees, and Shrubs of New England celebrates the beauty and diversity of New England's native plants through the artistic, scientific and technical aspects of botanical art and illustration.

This juried exhibition of more than 60 plant portraits is designed to promote public appreciation of the art and science of botanical art and illustration and to celebrate the diversity and beauty of plants from our own backyards.

New England is home to over 3,500 species of plants, which come in all shapes and sizes. Today, some 400-plus species are listed as rare or endangered.

“Botanical illustrations have a long and valued history in the world of science” commented Bob Raiselis, Montshire’s Exhibits Director. “A photograph can only show one example of a plant; an illustration by a skilled botanical illustrator can bring out the key characteristics of an entire species in their work, creating an iconic image of that plant and showing what differentiates that plant species from every other.”

Botanical art has documented the plant species of New England for centuries. Some species have disappeared, while others have moved recently into the region, following ever-shifting climates.

"Our native flora gives New England its distinctive character-think of fiery orange sugar maples ablaze in autumn, the vibrantly green swath of salt marshes along our coasts, or the tangled krummholz atop Mount Washington." says Elizabeth Farnsworth, Senior Research Ecologist, New England Wild Flower Society. "Plants are the lungs of our planet, generating the very oxygen we breathe. They protect our waterways from erosion and filter pollutants. They provide habitat and food for all the birds, insects, and mammals that delight us."

Visitors to From the Mountains to the Sea will be exposed to a wide variety of images of plant species as well as a large variety of artworks in several media by skilled illustrators who are members of The New England Society of Botanical Artists. Botanical illustration is part art and part science, and this exhibition features world-class illustrations of native New England plants by experts in their field.

 

The American Society of Botanical Artists, and its local chapter, The New England Society of Botanical Artists seek to: promote public appreciation of the art and science of botanical art and illustration; educate individuals and organizations about botanical art and illustration through exhibits, lectures, workshops, and outreach programs; understand the structure of plants and communicate this knowledge to their audience in an aesthetically pleasing manner; and preserve, protect and promote plant diversity.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

New Five-Year Grant Backs Powerful Approach to Science Learning in Rural Schools

Aug 12, 2013
For Immediate Release

Montshire Museum’s School Partnership Initiative Brings Science Teaching Expertise to Small Districts with Limited Resources.

The Montshire Museum’s School Partnership Initiative, which strengthens the study of science in rural K-8 schools in Vermont and New Hampshire, has received a five-year grant from a local high-tech company. 

Hypertherm, a New Hampshire–based manufacturer of advanced cutting systems, recently announced a five-year commitment to fund a portion of the Montshire Museum of Science’s School Partnership Initiative.

“We are thrilled to be supporters of the Montshire Museum’s School Partnership Initiative,” said Barbara Couch, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility at Hypertherm and President of the Hypertherm HOPE Foundation. “This program has been proven to lead the way both in building competence for teaching science and igniting a passion for science among students. This opportunity aligns perfectly with Hypertherm’s interest in supporting STEM projects.”

The initiative, run by the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, works with teachers and school districts to improve science education in rural schools. “Many of the rural school districts found in Northern New England are too small to support the infrastructure needed for outstanding science programs. They simply don’t have the resources to hire professional staff dedicated to developing and coordinating a high-quality science curriculum,” said Greg DeFrancis, director of education at the Montshire Museum. Additional funders, including the Donley Foundation, the Kettering Family Foundation, and the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory help support the initiative for the upcoming school year making possible a variety of activities and services in the classroom and at the Museum.

Why Focus on Youth Science Education?
Science education is critically important to the region and the nation. The STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math) have a major impact on the economy, the environment, health, international competitiveness, and technological innovation. But according to multiple assessments, such as the Program for International Student Assessment, the United States is no longer the leader in science education.

Through a longitudinal study of more than 3,300 young people, Dr. Robert Tai, a researcher at the University of Virginia, found that an interest in science, inspired before the age of 13, is more important than test scores in predicting a future career in science. Experts agree that a hands-on, inquiry-based approach can have a lasting impact on students’ attitudes and enthusiasm toward science and learning. 

Rural School Districts Present Unique Challenges in Science Teaching 
Northern New England’s small, rural school districts face ongoing challenges. Many districts don’t have the resources to hire staff dedicated to coordinating a high-quality science curriculum. Underfunded school systems are less able to invest in curriculum materials and teacher development.

Montshire’s School Partnership Initiative
The Montshire Museum developed its School Partnership Initiative (SPI) to support science education in the region’s rural K-8 schools, and to improve the learning experiences of individual students. The initiative brings together the Museum’s expertise in inquiry-based science learning and the schools’ sustained relationship with students and their families. Montshire provides its partner schools with a series of carefully crafted services and programs that will strengthen the entire school’s infrastructure and capacity to offer a high-quality science program to children in their critical early years.

The goals of the SPI are to improve student learning and their interest in science, to support schools in building their capacity and infrastructure to provide high-quality science education experiences for their students, to grow leadership for science within the partner school’s faculty and staff at the K-8 level, and to increase community and family involvement in science education.
Participating Schools
Ten schools in five rural districts in Vermont and New Hampshire are currently participating in the Initiative. "This type of support is exactly what schools need to increase the quality of science learning at the elementary level," comments Jeff Valence, Principal, Lyme School, Lyme, New Hampshire.

"Two-years ago, one of our teachers told me how she hated teaching science, it was her worst subject," said Tammy Russell, 7th/8th grade science teacher and SPI teacher-leader, Walden Elementary School, Walden, Vermont.  "After 18 months in the Montshire School Partnership program, she now tells me she loves teaching science and it is one of her favorite subjects! She did a complete 180!"
Initiative Details and Future Plans
Annually, the Montshire Museum of Science’s services to partnership schools include workshops for faculty and staff, model teaching and technical support in the classroom, free access to the Museum for the faculty, and a special Community Science Night for the school’s community at the Museum. The schools, in turn, commit to releasing faculty members for curriculum workshops and training; involving Montshire project staff in programs in math, science, and technology offered through the school district; and increasing the amount of classroom time dedicated to science education.

Over the next three years, Montshire will work to strengthen the links among faculty and administrators at the partner schools, while continuing to collect and analyze data on the impact of the School Partnership Initiative.

Participants in the School Partnership Initiative are confident that the lasting relationship being built between rural schools and the Montshire Museum will have a significant impact on student learning and excitement about science.
 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science Earns 2013 TRIPADVISOR Certificate of Excellence

May 23, 2013
For Immediate Release

Montshire honored as a top performing science museum as reviewed by travelers on the world’s largest travel site.

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE today announced that it has received a TripAdvisor® Certificate of Excellence award for the second year in a row. The accolade, which honors hospitality excellence, is given only to establishments that consistently achieve outstanding traveler reviews on TripAdvisor, and is extended to qualifying businesses worldwide. Only the top-performing 10 percent of businesses listed on TripAdvisor receive this prestigious award.

To qualify for a Certificate of Excellence, businesses must maintain an overall rating of four or higher, out of a possible five, as reviewed by travelers on TripAdvisor, and must have been listed on TripAdvisor for at least 12 months. Additional criteria include the volume of reviews received within the last 12 months.

"Monthsire is pleased to receive a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence,” again this year said Beth Krusi, Director of Marketing at Montshire. “We strive to offer our customers a memorable experience, and this accolade is evidence that our hard work is translating into positive reviews on TripAdvisor.”

“TripAdvisor is delighted to celebrate the success of businesses around the globe, from Sydney to Chicago, Sao Paulo to Rome, which are consistently offering TripAdvisor travelers a great customer experience,” said Alison Copus, Vice President of Marketing for TripAdvisor for Business. “The Certificate of Excellence award provides top performing establishments around the world the recognition they deserve, based on feedback from those who matter most – their customers.”

 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

New Exhibition Opens at the Montshire Museum

May 09, 2013
For Immediate Release

It’s everybody’s dream—to be able to control the clock. The Montshire Museum of Science challenges visitors to slow time down or speed it up to explore the natural world as never before in the new exhibition Playing with Time, from May 25 to September 8, 2013.

Playing With Time gives visitors the tools they need to see a previously hidden world: events that occur too quickly or too slowly for humans to perceive—the flap of a hummingbird’s wings or the expansion of the universe. This imaginative exhibition invites people to examine these invisible dynamics by using high-speed photography, time-lapse videos, and animations to effectively increase or decrease the speed of the world. Interactive exhibits, natural objects, and stunning displays allow visitors to experience natural phenomena occurring over vast timescales—from billionths of seconds to billions of years. Playing with Time also reveals the tools that help scientists make models, and the evidence they gather in order to better understand how our world works. By profiling scientists, Playing with Time shows that much scientific inquiry involves examining how things change. After “playing” with this elegant exhibition, visitors will begin to see the changes happening and gain a new appreciation for the ever-changing world.

The Playing with Time exhibition is divided into two major sections—Time Tools Lab and the Investigation Areas.

The Time Tools Lab is home to high-speed cameras, strobes, and other high-tech experimental tools that will allow visitors to slow down the popping of a popcorn kernel or perceive a stream of water as a flow of discrete water droplets. The Lab also features an opportunity for visitors to use a high-speed camera to capture themselves making all kinds of funny faces. When they play the video back in slow motion, they’ll be amazed at what they see!

The Investigation Areas, at the heart of Playing with Time, focus on the in-depth study of two subjects: changes in Earth and changes in life. In the area exploring Earth changes, visitors can see how scientists study lake cores and ice cores to find evidence of climate changes over hundreds of years. Unique interactive computer programs allow visitors to make Earth events go backward or forward. By manipulating the rate of change, visitors can learn about volcanic eruptions, glacial migration, and land erosion. The area of life change encourages visitors to explore changes in the human body and in the plant and animal worlds. They’ll have the chance to test their knowledge about which processes—for example, an eye blinking or a flower blooming—take longer.

 

Playing with Time will be on display at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, May 25–September 8, 2013, and is appropriate for both adults and children. Visitors may also attend special events and programs scheduled throughout the summer related to Playing with Time.

 

Playing with Time is a coproduction of the Science Museum of Minnesota and Red Hill Studios of Sausalito, California. Major funding for the exhibit was provided by the National Science Foundation.

Special Programs and Events for Playing with Time

Deep Time: A History of Life on Earth
Tuesday, July 9, 3 p.m.
Earth is old. Really old. Join us for this presentation on the 4 billion years of Earth’s history and how life has changed over time. Through the use of images, along with rocks, minerals, and fossils from the Museum’s collection, we will lay out a timeline to visualize what scientists call “deep time.” Best for ages 9 and above. Free with Museum admission.

Montshire Unleashed After-Hours Event
Friday, July 19, 6–9 p.m.
This summer’s Montshire Unleashed evening for adults will feature “Light Painting” to complement the Playing with Time exhibition. Bring your iPhone, or use our iPads to explore how to slow down light to create fun and intriguing photographs to share with others at this after-hours event. Free with Museum admission.

River Formations
Tuesday, July 23, 3 p.m.
Roll up your sleeves for this hands-on investigation at the Museum’s Science Discovery Lab. We will use stream tables to investigate how the force of water moves sediment, shapes rivers, and forms deltas over time. We will then zoom out and view satellite imagery of New England streams and rivers to see how Earth has changed in our own region over geologic time. Best for ages 8 and above. Free with Museum admission.

Animate It!
Summer camp program for middle school students
July 29–August 2, 1–4 p.m.
Using techniques both ancient and modern, campers will create the illusion of movement through animations. The week will begin with zoetropes and flipbooks and move into stop-motion filmmaking using cameras and computers. Campers will combine science and their creative side to make a showcase of animated short films. For students entering grades 6–8.

Rocky Puppet Show
Thursday, August 8, 11 a.m.
A story of rocks changing over time for families with young children.
Who knew that rocks could tell their own story? This energetic theater presentation introduces audiences of all ages to the way rocks change over time. The program concludes with an opportunity to handle the rock specimens that were included in the story. Free with Museum admission.

Stop-Motion Family Workshop
Thursday, August 22, 10:30–11:30 a.m.
Using the Montshire’s iPads and your creative juices, we’ll make short animated videos using the technique of stop-motion animation. Space is limited for this workshop. Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis at the admission desk on the day of the program. Free with Museum admission.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Named a 2013 “Best of New England —  Editors’ Choice” Winner by Yankee Magazine

May 06, 2013
For Immediate Release

Montshire Museum of Science has been recognized as a 2013 “Editors’ Choice” winner in Yankee Magazine’s Travel Guide to New England.

  The Editors' choice designation is awarded by Yankee’s editors and contributors, who name select restaurants, lodgings, and attractions in New England to the exclusive list. For 37 years, Yankee Magazine’s Travel Guide to New England has been the most widely distributed and best-selling guide to the six-state region, providing readers with a comprehensive vacation planning tool and daily reference.

“The Montshire is honored to receive this recognition from Yankee,” says Montshire Museum of Science Executive Director David Goudy. “I am very proud of the Museum’s staff and volunteers for their continued dedication to creating an exceptional experience for Museum visitors.”

“This major science center demystifies natural phenomena, from fireflies to fog, and offers movies and images from the Hubble space telescope,” writes Yankee. The Museum’s 110 acres in Norwich, Vt., includes Science Park with water features, the Woodland Garden, several miles of nature trails, and outdoor exhibits.

“Every one of the 300-plus places we highlight contains an untold back story about someone striving for perfection, having a dream, and having the vision to make a difference, whether it’s a small artisan’s studio or a lobster-in-the-rough shack or a dressed-up steakhouse on a tree-lined Boston street,” says Yankee’s editor, Mel Allen. ”While it may be hard to create a business, the true challenge is in making it work, being good enough that it endures and brings people back. Those are the qualities we look for and reward when we say ‘Best of New England.’”

Yankee Magazine’s May/June 2013 Travel Guide features 317 “Best of New England — Editors’ Choice” winners, in categories including  attractions, food & dining, lodging, and bargains.

 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

“How People Make Things” visiting exhibition, now at the Montshire Museum

Mar 27, 2013
For Immediate Release

Every wonder how everyday objects are made? "How People Make Things," a visiting exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science through June 2. 2013, tells that story by linking familiar objects to a process of manufacturing that combines people, ideas and technology.


How People Make Things, inspired by the factory tour segments from the Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood television series, offers hands-on activities using real factory tools and machines to create objects with four manufacturing processes - molding, cutting, deforming, and assembly. Many common manufactured products help tell the story of how people, ideas, and technology transform raw materials into finished products. 

Visitors can use a die cutter to make a box and a horse, operate a 3-axis mill to carve a block of wax, assemble parts of a real golf cart, and race a robotic arm to see who can more quickly assemble a replica of the signature trolley from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

In the “Main Office” visitors can don coveralls, lab coats, aprons, safety glasses, and hard hats to become a factory technician, worker or supervisor. They can also mold pourable wax, explore vacuum forming and injection molding, and match products to the mold from which they were made. The “People in Your Neighborhood" matching game, developed with The Saturday Light Brigade radio program, lets visitors use audio clues and stories help them match the person to the object they make.

“We see the origins of so few of the objects that are part of our lives today” commented Montshire Exhibits Director Bob Raiselis. “This exhibition connects visitors with the process by which everyday objects are made. We expect that after seeing this exhibition, visitors will look at the things that surround them in a whole new way – and younger visitors may well become interested enough to make engineering, manufacturing, or even traditional crafts, a part of their careers.”

“We know there will be some surprises for visitors when they see common everyday objects reveal the stories of how they came to be.”

How People Make Things was created by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Family Communications, Inc. (FCI), the producer of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, and the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out-of-School Environments (UPCLOSE). 

The exhibit was made possible with support from the National Science Foundation and The Grable Foundation.  Local sponsorship is provided by Copeland Furniture, Geokon, Hypertherm HOPE Foundation, and Timken Charitable Trust

How People Make Things will be at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont through June 2, 2013.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Rickards selected as Noyce Fellow

Feb 28, 2013
For Immediate Release

Montshire Museum's Associate Director Jennifer Rickards Receives Prestigious Noyce Fellowship

The Noyce Leadership Institute just announced that Jennifer Rickards, Associate Director of the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, was selected to participate in a yearlong sponsored fellowship, with the aim of increasing the public impact of science centers, museums, and related institutions. The Noyce Leadership Institute (NLI), in partnership with the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC), the European Network of Science Centers and Museums (ecsite), and the Association of Children’s Museums (ACM), and with funding from the Noyce Foundation, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, brings together leaders in informal science education from around the world to act as change agents at the crossroads of societal trends, global issues, and the cutting edge of science.

"The Noyce Leadership Institute is the most distinguished and highly competitive leadership program in our field, attracting the most promising science center leaders in the world," said Montshire's Executive Director, David Goudy.  "We are honored with Jennifer's selection and are confident that Montshire and the community will be the beneficiaries of her participation in this prestigious international program."

Through their NLI Fellowship experience, 17 senior-level and chief executives from science centers, children’s museums, natural history museums, and other related institutions that focus on public engagement with science will gain access to knowledge, tools, promising practices, and professional networks that increase their capacity to lead effectively and to advance innovation in their own institutions, in their home communities, and in the broader field. These remarkable leaders were selected because they are well positioned to influence others, manage change, and make an impact on their institutions and communities. Rickards will focus on developing a community partnership model to determine how the Montshire should engage underserved families in our region and implement new strategies to do so effectively.
“The NLI Fellowship will help to prepare the next generation of leaders to extend the impact of science centers and museums deeper into their local communities and to increase understanding and excitement about science,” said Dr. Geno Schnell, NLI program director.

NLI envisions an essential and transformative role for science centers and other informal science institutions in the engagement of citizens of every age in understanding crucial science-related issues. Leaders of such innovative hubs are supported and challenged by the Noyce Leadership Institute to make the individual, organizational, and community changes required to realize this vision.  From its inception in 2008 through this most recent cohort of Fellows, 105 Fellows have participated in NLI. These individuals represent 80 institutions from 25 nations.

The 2013–2014 Noyce Leadership Fellows were selected through a competitive process by a committee composed of professionals representing the fields of informal science education and executive leadership. The Fellowship program provides an action-learning framework via a mix of face-to-face sessions, executive coaching, peer learning, audio conferencing, and other learning strategies over a year, followed by ongoing Fellow alumni activities.

The Institute bears the name of Robert Noyce, co-founder of Intel and inventor of the integrated circuit. His work in leading science, engineering, and technology to a whole new level of innovation — as well as the creation of new industries — is legendary. Known for his integrity, authenticity, character, inclusiveness, and continuous innovation, Noyce’s legacy continues to serve as a standard for leaders today.
 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

How People Make Things Opens at the Montshire Museum of Science February 16, 2013

Feb 06, 2013
For Immediate Release

Every object in our world has a story of how it is made. "How People Make Things," a new exhibition opening at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont on February 16, 2013, tells that story by linking familiar childhood objects to a process of manufacturing that combines people, ideas and technology.

 How People Make Things, inspired by the factory tour segments from the Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood television series, offers hands-on activities using real factory tools and machines to create objects with four manufacturing processes - molding, cutting, deforming, and assembly. Many common manufactured products help tell the story of how people, ideas, and technology transform raw materials into finished products. 

Visitors can use a die cutter to make a box and a horse, operate a 3-axis mill to carve a block of wax, assemble parts of a real golf cart, and watch an injection molder make a plastic spoon that they can then take home.

At the entrance, visitors can don coveralls, lab coats, aprons, safety glasses, and hard hats to become a factory technician, worker or supervisor. They can also mold pourable wax, explore vacuum forming and injection molding, and match products to the mold from which they were made. The “People in Your Neighborhood" matching game, developed with The Saturday Light Brigade radio program, lets visitors use audio clues and stories help them match the person to the object they make.

“We see the origins of so few of the objects that are part of our lives today” commented Montshire Exhibits Director Bob Raiselis. “This exhibition connects visitors with the process by which everyday objects are made. We expect that after seeing this exhibition, visitors will look at the things that surround them in a whole new way – and younger visitors may well become interested enough to make engineering, manufacturing, or even traditional crafts, a part of their careers.”

“We know there will be some surprises for visitors when they see common everyday objects reveal the stories of how they came to be.”

The factory tour videos from the Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood television series featured in the exhibit depict the making of crayons, carousel horses, balls, stoplights, quarters, shoes, toy cars, and toy wagons. They are shown alongside real objects and the processes used to create them. The everyday products featured in How People Make Things include 10,000 Crayola crayons in 90 colors, toy wagons, stop lights, sneakers, baseball bats, baseball mitts, and matchbox cars.

How People Make Things was created by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Family Communications, Inc. (FCI), the producer of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, and the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out-of-School Environments (UPCLOSE).  The exhibition was made possible with support from the National Science Foundation and The Grable Foundation.  Local sponsorship is provided by Copeland Furniture, Geokon, Hypertherm HOPE Foundation, and Timken Charitable Trust

How People Make Things will be at the Montshire Museum from February 16 through June 2, 2013.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Hosts two Charley Harper exhibitions

Dec 11, 2012
For Immediate Release

Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper and Cartoonists' Take on Charley Harper: Graphic Work from The Center for Cartoon Studies exhibitions make their New England debut at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont.

View works by master illustrator and artist Charley Harper (1922-2007) whose life-long love of nature inspired his work comprising the exhibition Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper on display from December 1, 2012 through February 3, 2013 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont.

Harper was best known for his highly stylized wildlife prints, posters, and book illustrations. He called his style “minimal realism," capturing the essence of his subjects with the fewest possible visual elements. Using graphic shapes and bold colors, Harper distilled and simplified complex elements. His nature-oriented artwork is often contrasted with the realism of John James Audubon and is compared with the simplicity found in Inuit art.

Harper used many media for his artwork, but he is best known for his serigraph prints. Creator of the well-known children's book “The Golden Book of Biology,” Harper was an extraordinarily prolific graphic designer, contributing his unique, geometric style to a wide range of publications. He also created interpretive displays and “bio” posters for many nature-based organizations, including the National Park Service and the Cincinnati Zoo.

“We’re so pleased to be hosting this exhibition here at the Montshire,” said exhibits director Bob Raiselis. “Even museum visitors who don’t know about Charley Harper will recognize and appreciate his iconic style. His work is a unique interpretation of the natural world, and his art has inspired countless artists and graphic designers.”

The exhibition consists of 23 serigraphs along with hands-on art activities based on Harper’s style, including tangrams, a large puzzle, and rubbing stations.

When making arrangements to feature Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper, Montshire’s exhibits department began thinking about additional ways to enhance the visitor experience.

Conversations with The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS), in White River Junction, Vermont, led to the creation of a unique, contemporary exhibition, Cartoonists' Take on Charley Harper with work from their faculty and students. CCS created a series of one-page comics about an aspect of the natural world, using Charley Harper's basic visual technique of incorporating geometric shapes and patterns.

"Charley Harper was able to both simplify the natural world through playful abstraction, and tell a story with a single image—abilities to which every cartoonist should aspire." noted Jason Lutes, faculty member at The Center for Cartoon Studies.
Cartoonists' Take on Charley Harper: Graphic Work from The Center for Cartoon Studies will be on display alongside Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper at the Montshire Museum of Science December 1, 2012 through February 3, 2013.

Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper was created by the Virginia Living Museum. Creation of the exhibition was supported by the Virginia Commission for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Newport News Arts Commission.

The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS) is America’s premier cartooning school and studio located in the historic village of White River Junction, Vermont. CCS programs include a two-year Master of Fine Arts Degree, one- and two-year certificates in cartooning, and annual summer workshops. Faculty and visiting artists include many of today’s most celebrated cartoonists. CCS has received national acclaim for its work and prominent mention in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, and other publications. For more information, visit: cartoonstudies.org.

The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on science center located on 110 acres in Norwich, Vermont. Visitors will enjoy more than 100 interactive exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, technology, and more. The Montshire is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas).

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Cartoonists’ Take on Charley Harper: Graphic Work from The Center for Cartoon Studies

Nov 13, 2012
For Immediate Release

Work from faculty and students of The Center for Cartoon Studies will be featured in Cartoonists' Take on Charley Harper on display at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, December 1, 2012 through February 3, 2013. Beginning December 1, 2012, the Montshire Museum will feature an exhibition of works by graphic designer Charley Harper. The works included in Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper will highlight his iconic graphic style and focus on his work connected with the natural world.

Alongside Beguiled by the Wild, the Museum will mount an exhibition illustrating the influence and extension of his style. As part of their coursework this fall, students from The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS) in White River Junction, Vermont created a one-page comic about some aspect of nature, using Charley Harper's basic visual technique of incorporating geometric shapes and patterns. A number of these works by students of the school will be on display alongside the Charley Harper exhibition.

"Charley Harper was able to both simplify the natural world through playful abstraction, and tell a story with a single image—abilities to which every cartoonist should aspire."  –Jason Lutes, faculty member at The Center for Cartoon Studies

Cartoonists' Take on Charley Harper will open at the Montshire Museum on December 1, 2012 and will be on view through February 3, 2013.


About The Center for Cartoon Studies
The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS) is America’s premier cartooning school and studio located in the historic village of White River Junction, Vermont. CCS programs include a two-year Master of Fine Arts Degree, one- and two-year certificates in cartooning, and annual summer workshops. Faculty and visiting artists include many of today’s most celebrated cartoonists. CCS has received national acclaim for its work and prominent mention in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, and other publications. For more information, visit: cartoonstudies.org.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper makes its New England debut at the Montshire.

Oct 05, 2012
For Immediate Release

"Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper" makes its New England debut December 1, 2012 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont

View works by master illustrator and artist Charley Harper (1922-2007) whose life-long love of nature inspired his work comprising the exhibition “Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper” on display December 1, 2012 through February 3, 2013 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont.

Harper was best known for his highly stylized wildlife prints, posters, and book illustrations. He called his style “minimal realism," capturing the essence of his subjects with the fewest possible visual elements. Using graphic shapes and bold colors, Harper distilled and simplified complex elements. His nature-oriented artwork is often contrasted with the realism of John James Audubon and is compared with the simplicity found in Inuit art.

Harper used many media for his artwork, but he is best known for his serigraph prints. Creator of the well-known children's book “The Golden Book of Biology,” Harper was an extraordinarily prolific graphic designer, contributing his unique, geometric style to a wide range of publications. He also created interpretive displays and “bio” posters for many nature-based organizations, including the National Park Service and the Cincinnati Zoo.

“We’re so pleased to be hosting this exhibition here at the Montshire,” said exhibits director Bob Raiselis. “Even museum visitors who don’t know about Charley Harper will recognize and appreciate his iconic style. His is a unique interpretation of the natural world, and his art has inspired countless artists and graphic designers.”

The exhibition consists of 23 serigraphs along with hands-on art activities based on Harper’s style, including tangrams, a large puzzle, and rubbing stations.

Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper was created by the Virginia Living Museum. Creation of the exhibition was supported by the Virginia Commission for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Newport News Arts Commission.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

2012 Photo Contest Winners

Aug 31, 2012
For Immediate Release

Montshire announces the 2012 Photo Contest winners.

The Montshire is a source of wonder and discovery for all ages. The Montshire invites visitors to capture this feeling in a photograph and enter it in the Annual Montshire Photo Contest.

One winner was be selected among many outstanding entries in each of the following categories:

Doing Science
The Montshire is all about hands-on science. Museum programs, events, and exhibits allow participants to actively engage in science. Photos entered in this category capture someone (or several people) “doing science.”

Natural History and Scientific Phenomenon
Indoors and out, the Montshire’s 110 acres is alive. Capture your observations of plants and/or animals, or scientific phenomenon at the Montshire (with or without people) and enter your photo in this category.

Favorite Places or Exhibits
Everyone has his or her own favorite exhibit or special place. Whether it’s the bubble exhibits, airplay, the Woodland Garden, water exhibits, or the overlook on the River Trail—capture your favorite place or exhibit and enter your photo in this category.

   

photo credit (left to right)
Emily Fox; Barnard, Vermont
Erin Robbason; West Rutland, Vermont
Laurie Canuto; Littleton, New Hampshire

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

sLowlife, A Unique Exhibition Opens at the Montshire September 15

Aug 02, 2012
For Immediate Release

We know intellectually that plants are alive, but experiencing it directly is mostly in the realm of gardeners—it takes time.

Many of us think of and treat plants as inanimate objects. However, a plant grows, reacts to changes in its environment, reproduces, responds to disease and injury, and undergoes a slow decline into old age and death – a saga that sounds hauntingly familiar. Contrary to our conscious perception, plants do move…be it ever so slowly.

Through vivid time-lapse photography and movies, sLowlife accelerates the time-scale of plants into our own frame of reference, speeding up their everyday lives to a pace that resonates with our own. “We take great pride in the living landscape of our 100-acre museum here at the Montshire,” states Bob Raiselis, Exhibits Director at the Montshire, “and this new exhibition will help visitors to understand just how alive that landscape is.” Raiselis continues, “By turning time on its head, the creators of sLowlife have given us a whole new way to look at plants, their activities, their movement, and their lives.”

sLowlife is an exciting exhibition that uses science, art, and technology to provide alternative dimensions for experiencing plants. It presents unusual and sometimes unnerving perspectives on how a plant reacts, both short-term and long-term, to its inner and outer worlds. Using scientific data from the plant studies on which the exhibition was based, nationally known composer John Gibson, Indiana University, created a fascinating musical score to accompany the exhibition.

sLowlife is a collaborative project of the United States Botanic Garden (USBG), the Chicago Botanic Garden and Roger Hangarter, Indiana University. Additional support has been provided by the American Society of Plant Biologists, Indiana University and the National Science Foundation. The local appearance of sLowlife is made possible by Longacre’s Nursery Center and Henderson's Tree Service & Fine Gardening. sLowlife is based on an original concept by Hangarter and Dennis DeHart, State University of New York.

Slowlife exhibition will be at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont from Saturday, September 15–Sunday, November 25, 2012.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Hosts Community-created Art Installation June 30–September 9.

Jun 12, 2012
For Immediate Release

How are words like water? "Stream of Conscience: River of Words," a public-participation art project at the Montshire Museum of Science by artist Christine Destrempes poses this question.

The condition of our water—lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands, and oceans—is an indicator of our collective and historical actions. As we listen, we become aware of the changes in water quality and scarcity. We notice that water speaks for the planet just as our words speak for us.

Throughout the summer, participants of all ages are invited to write their thoughts, memories, and reflections about water on serpentine-shaped tiles. The individual tiles are attached together to form a river flowing along a fence at the Montshire throughout the summer. Museum visitors are invited to add to the  installation so that the river of words continues to flow.

About the Stream of Conscience: River of Words exhibit
Destrempes conceptual foundation of Stream of Conscience: River of Words is based on a quote from Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Buddhist Monk, “We are here to awaken from the illusion of our separateness.” If one thinks of the earth’s waterways as representing life, each of us is like a ripple or wave. We rise up, crest, roar to the shore, then slip back to join all the other waves that have been or are about to be. For a brief moment in time, we are distinct, but never separate. This installation at the Montshire offers an opportunity for individual voices to demonstrate the power of collective expression through a river of emotion, which symbolizes our interconnectedness with each other and all of life. We live in a land of abundance, but elsewhere, available clean water is a luxury, diminishing in the face of a growing population. For many people all over the world, access to clean water is limited. As a result, five million people die every year from preventable, water-related diseases.

With the earth’s finite water supply increasingly sold, squandered, and sullied, Stream of Conscience: River of Words articulates a response. It is created by a multitude of individual voices reflecting on the importance of water, the inspiration it provides, and our responsibility to protect it. Stream of Conscience: River of Words taps our most abundant resource – our imagination – to raise awareness and promote advocacy for access to clean water. It is a hopeful appeal to our ability to change course.

The Montshire Museum of Science, Stream of Conscience: River of Words installation will consist of serpentine-shaped tiles in colors that evoke ripples of water in a stream. The tiles will be attached to one another and will appear to flow over the top of the fence and will run along its length in a curving line for about 50 feet. It will be approximately 3.5 feet wide and at the end, it will appear to flow into the ground. The Stream of Conscience: River of Words installation at the Montshire is made possible with funding from Benjamin Schore.

The Montshire Museum is located along the banks of the Connecticut River— the longest and largest river in New England, spanning over 400 miles from Canada through four states. It touches the lives of millions as a resource for drinking water, agriculture, transportation, recreation, wildlife, scenic beauty, and commerce. The river connects New Englanders to one another by our shared interest in its environmental health. The objective of creating this Stream of Conscience: River of Words installation along the Connecticut River is to raise awareness not only of the value of clean water in general, but also how water connects the towns, cities, and individuals along the river.

About the artist
After a career as a graphic designer and illustrator, Christine Destrempes turned to fine art. Her contemplative paintings and monotypes prints have been exhibited nationally and appear in numerous corporate and private collections.

As her concern for global water issues grew, Destrempes founded Art for Water and embarked on a mission to raise awareness of the shrinking availability of clean water through creating monumental, public-participation installations. Art for Water engages people of all ages as activists through creative self-expression as a path to social change, fosters stewardship of our most precious natural resource, and inspires advocacy for those living without basic needs. Art for Water's mission is to create a water ethic where everyone respects water for its necessity for all of life.

Destrempes has curated water-themed group and solo exhibits. Her installation, Stream of Conscience, is in Ripple Effect: the Art of H2O at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA through July of 2012. Stream of Conscience appeared in The Value of Water at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in New York, in Uncommon River at the Prichard Art Gallery, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID and in River of Words Stream of Conscience at the Sharon Arts Downtown Gallery, Peterborough, NH.
 

EVENT
Stream of Conscience: River of Words public-participation event
Tuesday, June 26, 4:30–6 p.m.
Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich Vermont
Free and open to the public

Artist Christine Destrempes will talk about the Stream of Conscience: River of Words project and global water issues; and Rebecca Brown, author and president of the Connecticut River Joint Commissions board of directors will present a regional perspective with an overview of the river's challenges and opportunities.

Following the presentation, attendees are invited to contribute a personal message, memory, reflection, or idea—anything that conveys his/her thoughts and feelings about water on one of the blank 'waves.'

Each voice, combined with others, will make this a powerful river of words that will inspire greater awareness of one of our most precious natural resources.

The event is free of charge and open to the public.
Please RSVP to beth.krusi@montshire.org

For more information about Stream of Conscience: River of Words visit /exhibitsfeatured-exhibitions/stream-of-conscience/

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Make Some Noise at the Montshire!

May 16, 2012
For Immediate Release

Explore the science of sound and hearing at the Montshire Museum’s new traveling exhibition, Sonic Sensation, opening on May 26 in Norwich, Vermont.

Experience our sonic world and the sensation of being surrounded by everyday sounds in this interactive exhibition. Experiment with pitch, test your own hearing, make a movie soundtrack, and step into the ever-popular Scream Chamber!

In a lively, engaging manner, Sonic Sensation presents a fun and informative opportunity to explore sound in our environment. Learn about the anatomy and physics of how we hear, find out about decibels, amplitude, frequency, pitch, sound waves, and what you can do to protect your hearing.

Sort high and low pitches by hitting colored bells, create sounds by conducting an Invisible Orchestra, and launch a billiard ball to show how sound hitting our eardrums sends signals to our brain.

Sonic Sensation consists of fourteen fun, interactive exhibits. “Each exhibit is designed to spark conversation and encourage interaction among Museum visitors,” said Bob Raiselis, exhibits director.

Other components invite you to measure the frequency of sounds, match mystery sounds, and try to find hidden “animals” in kitchen cupboards by listening (no peeking!).  Young visitors will want try out Ear This!, a fun family photo op where they can see how they look with the ears of an elephant, rabbit, bat and more.

Museum members and visitors will make a lot of noise at this exhibition on display through September 4, 2012.

Sonic Sensation was developed by Sciencenter of Ithaca, New York, based on an exhibition originally designed by the Montshire.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum among Trekaroo.com’s Top Ten Science and Technology Museums.

Apr 19, 2012
For Immediate Release

Trekaroo pored over thousands of reviews on its site and put together this handy guide to the top science & technology museums across the country, as voted by their trusted and experienced Trekaroo users.

Montshire Museum is the only New England museum that made the Top Ten list, and it is the only small museum and the only rural museum on the list.

 
10.  McWane Science Center*
Birmingham, AL

9. California Academy of Sciences
San Francisco, CA

8.  Pacific Science Center*
Seattle, WA

7.  Maryland Science Center*
Baltimore, MD

6.  Center of Science & Industry (COSI)*
Columbus, OH
 
5.  Oregon Museum of Science & Industry*
Portland, OR

4.  Montshire Museum of Science
Norwich, VT


3.  Museum of Science and Industry*
Chicago, IL
 
2.  Franklin Institute*
Philadelphia, PA

1.  TECHNOLOGY: The Tech Museum of Innovation*
San Jose, CA

1. NATURAL HISTORY: American Museum of Natural History
  Manhattan, NY

1. PLANETARIUM:  Griffith Park Observatory
Los Angeles, CA

1. OVERALL:  Exploratorium*
San Francisco, CA

Here are Trekaroo’s honorable mention science & tech museums:
Museum of Life and Science, Durham, NC
Museum of Science, Cambridge, MA
California Science Center, Los Angeles, CA
SciPort: Louisiana Science Center, Shreveport, LA
Discovery Science Center, Santa Ana, CA

 

Click here to link to the full report.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

4th Annual Montshire Photo Contest

Apr 17, 2012
For Immediate Release

Montshire Announces the 4th Annual Photo Contest

The Montshire Museum is a source of wonder and discovery for all ages.
Montshire members and visitors are invited to capture this feeling in a photograph and enter it in the  Montshire Museum's 4th Annual Photo Contest.

Participants may enter up to two photographs in any (or all) of the following three catagories:
Doing Science  Museum programs, events, and exhibits allow participants to actively engage in science. Photos entered in this category capture someone (or several people) “doing science.”
Natural History and Scientific Phenomenon  Montshire is a 100-acre Museum. Photographs of plants and/or animals, or scientific phenomenon at the Montshire (with or without people) may be entered in this category.
Favorite Places or Exhibits Everyone has his or her own favorite exhibit or special place at the Montshire. Whether it’s the Bubbles, Airplay, the Woodland Garden, or Science Park—capture your favorite place or exhibit and enter your photo in this category.

ENTRY GUIDELINES:
Submit up to 2 photographs in each category.
Entries must be submitted electronically using the online entry form. Complete one entry form for each photo you upload. 
Photos must be between 1 and 10 MB in size. Both color and black & white photographs are acceptable.
Eligibility: Any Montshire members or visitor is eligible to enter. Montshire employees, members of the Museum's board of trustees and their families are not eligible. There is no cost to participate.

PRIZE: The first place winner in each category will receive a $25 gift certificate to Montshire’s Museum Store.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Hosts Annual Egg Drop Challenge

Apr 04, 2012
For Immediate Release

Will a raw egg survive the harrowing 18-foot plunge over the second story balcony? Participate in the Montshire's Annual Egg Drop Challenge, Saturday, April 14 and find out.

The challenge, should you accept it: design a container that will protect an egg when it's dropped off the Montshire balcony.
Previous events have produced great achievements in creative engineering and design. Some containers use materials such as paper, packing “peanuts,” bubble wrap or balloons to cushion the fall, while others suspend the egg in a container, or involve an intricate parachute arrangement. This year's entries are expected to be even more egg-citing!
Make a container at home, or build one at the Museum the day of the event from noon-2 p.m. Then, from 2-4 p.m., it's "eggs away" as you launch your egg in it's container at an official "drop site."
Originality and creativity are appreciated, but designs may not include liquids, lighter-than-air gases, or glass. Please keep the container smaller than one foot on all sides, with total weight under 1 pound. 
Mixing raw eggs and gravity usually means one big mess—but not always. Join us for this special event that's full of anticipation and surprises. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Charlie and Kiwi’s Evolutionary Adventure Leads them to the Montshire Museum

Jan 11, 2012
For Immediate Release

Go on an evolutionary adventure and discover the link between dinosaurs and modern birds, when Charlie and Kiwi's Evolutionary Adventure exhibition opens at the Montshire Museum of Science January 21, 2012.

Charlie and Kiwi's adventure unfolds in an intimate theater on a giant digital storybook screen. Audiences travel back in time during the 12-minute video, "Charlie and the Very Odd Bird", starring Charlie and his great, great, great, great grandfather as they discover how and why the flightless kiwi is still a bird. Through the charming drawings of Peter Reynolds, award-winning illustrator of "Judy Moody" and other children's books, visitors see how Charlie comes to understand the origins of birds and why they are all so different from each other. 



The exhibition invites visitors to see evidence that dinosaurs are the ancestors of modern birds by viewing the homologous bones of a Bambiraptor (a dinosaur), archaeopteryx (one of the first birds) and comparing them to those of a modern crow. An interactive computerized exhibit station allows visitors to adjust the speed up time so they can witness the evolution of birds with their own eyes. Fun puzzles show how birds have adapted to a variety of environments.

One exhibit includes an assortment of living birds of the same species. Visitors observe the slight differences between the birds by examining the colors, shapes and sizes of their beaks, legs and feet. Variations like these in natural populations are the source of evolution by natural selection. Through a variety of discovery boxes, visitors play games, work puzzles, and participate in hands-on activities that enhance understanding of evolutionary concepts.

Charlie and Kiwi's Evolutionary Adventure, funded by a generous grant from the National Science Foundation, is a project of the New York Hall of Science, the University of Michigan, the Miami Science Museum and the North Museum of Natural History and Science.

Charlie and Kiwi's Evolutionary Adventure will be at the Montshire Museum of Science through May 6, 2012. The exhibition was funded in part by donors to Montshire's "100+ Challenge Campaign."
 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

School Visits to the Montshire—Only $1 per student during January

Nov 25, 2011
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vt—School groups visiting the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont pay only $1 per student January 3-31, 2012.  Prices for VisitPlus and Montshire Presents! programs are also reduced during this time. Montshire's workshops and hands-on exhibits that allow students to engage their senses and experience science on a new level.

School Visit Bus

The Montshire Museum is full of hands-on exhibits indoors and out. Visiting exhibitions throughout the year supplement the permanent collection, so there’s always something new. In addition to great exhibits, the Montshire Museum of Science offers a myriad of workshops for grades K-9, all of which are designed to foster a child’s understanding of scientific phenomena and supplement the school’s science curriculum.  Workshops vary in length from 30 to 60 minutes and are taught by Montshire’s science educators.

Schools interested in taking advantage of this special pricing should visit the Montshire’s website at http://www.motnshire.org/for-teachers or call 802-649-2200 for more information. The Montshire is conveniently located just off I-91 at Exit 13, and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

This program is made possible with funding from Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Glimpse Into a World That Most Have Never Seen, at Montshire Museum of Science.

Nov 18, 2011
For Immediate Release

"Nikon Small World" exhibition is a window into a universe that can only be seen through the lens of a microscope. December 3, 2010–January 16, 2012, at Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Vermont.

Awaken the sense of discovery and see into another world that exists beyond perceptible vision. The 2011 Nikon Small World exhibition merges science and art with award winning photomicrographs opens in December 3, 2010 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, and runs through January 16, 2012

This year's winning entries display a number of outstanding images covering a wide range of biological, chemical, and material substances. More than 1,900 images from around the world were submitted during the competition, which were evaluated by an independent five-person judging panel on their originality, informational content, technical proficiency, and visual impact. These 20 award-winning photomicrographs on tour during 2011 will connect visitors to the world around them—both seen and unseen.

"What was once a science specimen under a microscope has become curated art for public appreciation," says Lee Shuett, Executive Vice President of Nikon Instruments, Inc. "We are proud to be able to educate people about the importance of photomicrography in scientific research while integrating science into mainstream art."

Recognizing Excellence in Photography through the Microscope

The Nikon International Small World Competition first began in 1974 as a means to recognize and applaud the efforts of those involved with photography through the light microscope. Since then, Small World has become a leading showcase for photomicrographers from the widest array of scientific disciplines.

A photomicrograph is a technical document that can be of great significance to science or industry. But a good photomicrograph is also an image whose structure, color, composition, and content is an object of beauty, open to several levels of comprehension and appreciation.

The Nikon Small World Competition is open to anyone with an interest in photography through the microscope. Truly international in scope, entries have been received from the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Winners have included both professionals and hobbyists.

The subject matter is unrestricted and any type of light microscopy technique is acceptable, including phase contrast, polarized light, fluorescence, interference contrast, darkfield, confocal, deconvolution, and mixed techniques. Entries submitted to Nikon are then judged by an independent panel of experts who are recognized authorities in the area of photomicrography and photography. These entries are judged on the basis of originality, informational content, technical proficiency and visual impact.

About the Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, offering more than 100 exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, the environment, and technology. The building is located on 110 acres bordering the Connecticut River. The Museum’s outdoor environment is a large part of the visitor experience. Science Park is a two-acre outdoor exhibit area in a beautiful, park-like setting and connects to a network of easy to moderate nature trails for visitors of all ages. The Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

View the Earth from Above in Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science

Sep 01, 2011
For Immediate Release

Earth From Space opens in Norwich, Vermont, September 17, 2011

NORWICH, VT, July 19, 2011 — Each day, high above the clouds, dozens of sophisticated imaging satellites circle the Earth. These high-tech machines are capable of capturing extraordinary conditions and events that are nearly impossible to document from the surface of the planet. These vivid images, which reveal the awesome beauty of the planet’s surface through the "eyes" of a space satellite, are on display in a remarkable Smithsonian traveling exhibition.
Earth from Space opens at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, September 17, 2011, and will remain on view through November 27, 2011, when the exhibition continues its national tour.
The exhibition features approximately 40 beautifully detailed satellite images of our planet—from the swirling arms of a massive hurricane and the grid-like pattern of Kansas farmland to the triangular shadows cast by the Great Pyramids and the sinuous channels entering the Arctic Ocean. Earth From Space illustrates how satellite imagery is gathered and used to expand humankind’s understanding of life on Earth, and explores the remote sensing technology used to gather the images and discusses the individual satellites whose images are on display.
A Magic Planet digital video globe—a sphere-shaped screen with a digital display —complements the traveling exhibition. The animations on this tool will allow visitors to observe the global extent of images returned from orbiting satellites.
Earth from Space was developed by the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES). Andrew Johnston, a geographer at the National Air and Space Museum’s Center for Earth and Planetary Studies and author of "Earth from Space" (Firefly Books, 2004), is the exhibition’s curator.
The exhibition is made possible by Global Imagination. Additional support is provided by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

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The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum maintains the largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft in the world, is a vital center for research into the history, science and technology of aviation and space flight, and commemorates the development of aviation and space flight. The Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, a scientific research unit within the museum, performs original research and outreach activities on topics covering planetary science, terrestrial geophysics and the remote sensing of environmental change.

SITES has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for more than 50 years. SITES connects Americans to their shared cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play. Exhibition descriptions and tour schedules are available at http://www.sites.si.edu.

The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, offering more than 125 exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, the environment, and technology. The building is located on 110 acres bordering the Connecticut River. The Museum’s outdoor environment is a large part of the visitor experience. Science Park is a two-acre outdoor exhibit area in a beautiful, park-like setting and connects to a network of nature trails for visitors of all ages. More information about Montshire Museum of Science can be found at https://www.montshire.org. The Montshire is open daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas).


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Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Sherlock Terry Joins Montshire Museum’s Exhibits Department

Aug 26, 2011
For Immediate Release

Sherlock Terry recently joined the Museum's exhibits department as the exhibits assistant. In addition to researching and scheduling traveling exhibitions, managing the aquarium exhibits, Sherlock will be creating and updating signage throughout the museum and grounds, and assisting in the creation and evaluation of new exhibits. Sherlock worked as an exhibit consultant, as an exhibit developer at Explora! Science Museum in Albuquerque, New Mexico, as co-director of the Donkey Gallery, also in Albuquerque, and as an instructor in digital media at Johnson State College. He received a B.F.A. from Concordia University in Montreal and a M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico. Sherlock is a native of Vermont, and he and his family have relocated to the Upper Valley from northern Vermont.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Summer at the Montshire - It Just Keeps Getting Better!

May 23, 2011
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VT, May 23, 2011 — Montshire Museum's Science Park and summer go hand-in-hand. Floating balls down the Rill, creating amazing shapes with flowing water at Water Bells, and enjoying an interactive immersion in the Water Dance exhibit are great ways to spend a summer day in Norwich, Vermont. This year visitors have something new to look forward to. First, the new Hughes Pavilion overlooking Montshire's Science Park offers summer visitors a needed respite from the sun or light rain, and the adjacent rest rooms provide extra convenience.

The new pavilion also provides the perfect spot for King Arthur Flour to serve lunch to Montshire visitors. Beginning June 23 through Labor Day (10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.) visitors may purchase a delicious lunch and yummy snacks under the pavilion. Prepared daily by King Arthur Flour, offerings will include sandwiches, fruit, granola bars, chips, ice cream, cookies, and cold beverages.

No longer do you need to leave the Museum for lunch or remember to pack a picnic. But, don't forget the swimsuit, towel, and sunscreen.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Science and Art Converge in Vermont Montshire Museum and Frog Hollow Select Winning Benches

Mar 21, 2011
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VT, March 21, 2011— The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich and Frog Hollow announce a collaboration that involves Vermont artists in the creation of five benches for the Montshire Museum's Woodland Garden. Members of the Vermont Furniture Guild and juried Frog Hollow artisans were invited to submit proposals that were juried to select five designs for commission by the Montshire Museum.

"I am very excited about this collaboration," says David Goudy, Montshire Museum's executive director. "The Museum's Woodland Garden is a spectacular area showcasing native and medicinal plants—handcrafted benches made by Vermont's premier artisans along the path will greatly enhance both the natural beauty of the Woodland Garden and the visitor experience."

Frog Hollow will host a gallery exhibit May 1–31, featuring the five completed benches. After the show, the benches will be permanently installed in the Montshire Museum's Woodland Garden for visitors to enjoy. The goal is to expand public awareness of and appreciation for the work of Vermont artisans, while providing artistic and functional features that will enhance visitors' enjoyment of the Woodland Garden.

Frog Hollow director Rob Hunter comments, “In our constant effort to integrate arts and education, we are delighted to partner with the Montshire. We look forward to exhibiting the benches in our Burlington gallery prior to the installation at the Montshire. Our hope is to bring about a deeper understanding and appreciation of two of Vermont's treasures—the fine craftsmanship of Vermont artisans and the Montshire Museum.”
Entries were judged on the artistic merit of the proposed design, the dimensions, materials and fabrication techniques, and the appropriateness of the piece to the Woodland Garden environment and the mission of the Montshire. Selected artists will be provided a commission for their work.

The five benches being commissioned include work from Doug Clarner (East Burke), Mark Dablestein (Burlington), Dave Hurwitz (Randolph), Lars Larsen and Rolf Kielman (Burlington), and Dan Mosheim (Dorset).

About the Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, offering more than 100 exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, the environment, and technology. The building is located on 110 acres bordering the Connecticut River. The Museum’s outdoor environment is a large part of the visitor experience. Science Park is a two-acre outdoor exhibit area in a beautiful, park-like setting and connects to a network of easy to moderate nature trails for visitors of all ages. More information about Montshire Museum of Science can be found at https://www.montshire.org.

About Frog Hollow
Frog Hollow is dedicated to the exposure and appreciation of Vermont fine craftsmanship. Frog Hollow's gallery in Burlington exhibits a unique collection of fine traditional and contemporary Vermont art and craft. We work statewide with a variety of organizations in arts education programming and the promotion of art and craft.

Frog Hollow began in 1971 and in 1975 received the distinction of being named the first state craft center in the nation. More information can be found at http://www.froghollow.org

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Hosts Traveling Exhibition That Reveals Biomechanics of Robot Animals

Mar 15, 2011
For Immediate Release

National touring exhibition featuring Robot Zoo opens in Norwich, Vermont on May 21, 2011

NORWICH, VT, March 15, 2011  — Robot Zoo, the nationally touring exhibition reveals the magic of nature as a master engineer. Visit the Montshire Museum May 21–September 11, 2011, and explore the biomechanics of complex animal robots to discover how real animals work. Robot animals and hands-on activities illustrate fascinating real-life characteristics of animals, such as how a chameleon changes colors and a fly walks on the ceiling.

Machinery in the robot animals simulates the body parts of their real-life counterparts. In the robot animals, muscles become pistons, intestines become filtering pipes and brains become computers.

Hands-on activities that are part of the exhibition include "Swat the Fly," where you can compare your reaction time to a house fly, and "Sticky Feet," invites visitors to don special hand and knee pads and try to stick like flies to a sloped surface. Triggering the "Tongue Gun" demonstrates how a real chameleon shoots out its long, sticky-tipped tongue to reel in a meal.

The exhibit is based on the book “The Robot Zoo” which was conceived, edited, and designed by Marshall Editions of London, England. Robot Zoo exhibition is touring major science and natural history museums throughout North America and Europe.

About the Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, offering more than 100 exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, the environment, and technology. The building is located on 110 acres bordering the Connecticut River. The Museum’s outdoor environment is a large part of the visitor experience. Science Park is a two-acre outdoor exhibit area in a beautiful, park-like setting and connects to a network of easy to moderate nature trails for visitors of all ages. The Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum’s Director of Education receives Prestigious National Fellowship

Mar 01, 2011
For Immediate Release

Norwich, VT — Montshire's Director of Education Greg DeFrances is one of just 18 museum leaders who has been selected as a Noyce Fellow by the Noyce Leadership Institute. The Noyce Foundation, in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) offers a highly competitive sponsored fellowship program to increase the public impact of science centers.

"NLI aims to increase the capacity of individuals to lead these dynamic organizations," said Dr. Geno Schnell, NLI Program Director. "We're excited about the potential of working with this next generation of leaders to increase the level of innovation and community impact at their home institution and in the science center field as a whole."

Through their Fellowship experience, 18 leaders from science centers, children's museums, natural history museums, and related institutions will gain access to knowledge, tools, best practices, and professional networks that increase their capacity to lead effectively and to advance innovation in their own institutions and the broader community. NLI envisions an essential and transformative role for science centers in the engagement of citizens of every age in understanding crucial science-related issues. Leaders of such innovative hubs will be supported and challenged by the Noyce Leadership Institute to make the individual, organizational, and community changes required to realize this vision.

We are honored that this prestigious fellowship is recognizing Greg’s skill and accomplishments as leader of Montshire’s education programs, said David Goudy, Executive Director of the Montshire Museum. "The Noyce Institute works on an international scale to bring together the most promising talent for the next generation of science museum leadership. This award also recognizes Montshire's professionalism as a center for science education serving people of Vermont and New Hampshire."

The 2011-2012 Noyce Leadership Fellows each completed a rigorous application process and were selected by a cadre of senior professionals from the fields of science centers and executive education.  The Fellowship program provides a mix of face-to-face sessions, coaching, peer learning, audio conferencing, and other learning strategies over a year, followed by ongoing Fellow alumni activities.

The 18 Noyce Fellows and their Strategic Initiative Sponsors are:

At-Bristol, United Kingdom
Fellow: Dan Bird, Exhibitions Director
Sponsor: Goéry Delacôte, CEO

Boston Children's Museum, Massachusetts
Fellow: Gail Ringel, Vice President, Exhibits and Production
Sponsor: Carole Charnow, President

California Science Center
Fellow: Diane Perlov, Senior Vice President for Exhibits
Sponsor: Jeffrey Rudolph, President

Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation
Fellow: Stacy Wakeford, Director, Exhibitions
Sponsor: Denise Amyot, President and CEO

Detroit Zoological Society, Michigan
Fellow: Scott Carter, Chief Life Sciences Officer
Sponsor: Ron Kagan, Executive Director and CEO

Exploratorium, California
Fellow: Tom Rockwell, Director of Exhibits
Sponsor: Rob Semper, Executive Associate Director

Hagley Museum and Library, Delaware
Fellow: Joan Hoge-North, Deputy Director for Museum Administration
Sponsor: Geoff Halfpenny, Executive Director

Miami Science Museum, Florida
Fellow: Sean Duran, Vice President, Exhibition and Design
Sponsor: Gillian Thomas, CEO

Montshire Museum of Science, Vermont
Fellow: Greg DeFrancis, Director of Education
Sponsor: David Goudy, Executive Director

Museum of Science, Boston, Massachusetts
Fellow: Andrea Durham, Director, Exhibit Development and Conservation
Co-Sponsor: Paul Fontaine, Vice President, Education
Co-Sponsor: Anne Cademenos, Director of Corporate, Foundation and Government Relations

National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution, District of Columbia
Fellow: Shari Werb, Director of Education and Outreach
Co-Sponsor: Claudine Brown, Assistant Secretary for Education and Access
Co-Sponsor: Cristián Samper, Director

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, California
Fellow: Karen Wise, Vice President, Education and Exhibitions
Sponsor: Jane Pisano, President and Director

Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
Fellow: Johannes Vogel, Keeper of Botany
Sponsor: Michael Dixon, Director

Omaha Children's Museum, Nebraska
Fellow: Jeff Barnhart, Chief Museum Officer
Sponsor: Lindy Hoyer, Executive Director

OMSI, Oregon
Fellow: Marcie Benne, Evaluation and Visitor Studies Manager
Sponsor: Ray Vandiver, Vice President, Center for Learning Experiences

Science Center NEMO, Netherlands
Fellow: Amito Haarhuis, Manager Science Learning Center
Sponsor: Michiel Buchel, General Manager/Director

Technopolis, Belgium
Fellow: Patricia Verheyden, Experience Director
Sponsor: Eric Jacquemyn, CEO

Teknikens Hus, Sweden
Fellow: Eva Jonsson, Deputy Director
Sponsor: Olle Nordberg, Director

The Institute bears the name of Robert Noyce, co-founder of Intel and inventor of the integrated circuit.  His work in leading science, engineering, and technology to a whole new level of innovation – as well as the creation of new industries – is legendary.  Known for his integrity, authenticity, character, inclusiveness, and continuous innovation, his legacy continues to serve as a standard for leaders today.

ASTC is a nonprofit organization of science centers and museums dedicated to furthering the public engagement with science among increasingly diverse audiences. ASTC works with science centers and museums to address critical societal issues, locally and globally, where understanding of and engagement with science are essential. In addition, ASTC provides professional development for the science center field, promotes best practices, supports effective communication, strengthens the position of science centers within the community at large, and fosters the creation of successful partnerships and collaborations.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute's mission is to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas. The Institute works at the national level and in coordination with state and local organizations to sustain heritage, culture, and knowledge; enhance learning and innovation; and support professional development.

Primary funding for the Institute comes from the Noyce Foundation, with additional support to date from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the David & Lucile Packard Foundation. 

About Montshire Museum of Science: The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, offering more than 100 exciting exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, ecology, and technology. Located on a 110-acre site near the Connecticut River, the Montshire Museum has been a part of the Upper Valley community since 1976. The purpose of the Montshire Museum is to create, awaken, foster, and nurture an interest in and curiosity about the physical and natural world by providing programs, experiences, and exhibits emphasizing real objects and phenomena. For more information about the Montshire Museum visit https://www.montshire.org

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science AND BLUE MAN GROUP MAKING WAVES

Feb 11, 2011
For Immediate Release

Blue Man Group Contact:
Nancy Hirsch  – 212.967.3805
nancy@hirschgroup.com

National touring exhibit featuring Blue Man Group in Norwich, Vermont through May 8, 2011

NORWICH, VT, February 11, 2011 — Blue Man Group - Making Waves, the national touring exhibit supported by Harman/Becker Automotive Systems and created by the Boston Children’s Museum and Blue Man Group and powered by JBL®, just opened at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont.  The 1,500 square foot exhibit — designed to bring together science and art — will take the whole family through a multi sensory exploration of sound that provides an opportunity to play together while discovering the fun of music.

Onstage, the Blue Man is one part inquisitive child, one part trickster, and one part superhero on a journey of discovery. Throughout Blue Man Group—Making Waves families are encouraged to learn, play and explore with the same curiosity as these renowned performing artists.

“We are thrilled to have such a unique and interactive exhibition here at the Montshire,” says Museum Director David Goudy. “ Our goal is to provide visitors with fun and meaningful experiences. The Blue Man Group – Making Waves exhibition does this exceptionally well. ”

Co-founder of Blue Man Group, Chris Wink says, “After years of being able to express ourselves creatively on stage, it has become increasingly important to us to develop experiences that encourage and expand the creative development of others-particularly children and their parents.  We're very excited to see this exhibit come to life with JBL technology, and who better to demonstrate the true value of understanding quality sound than Harman. ”

At the Slide-u-lum, Build-u-lum, Sand Drum and Theramin children will have an opportunity to see, feel and create sound.  At the PVC Station visitors of all ages will have a chance to play the unique Blue Man Group instruments, while learning how sound works and the whole experience culminates in the JBL®-equipped Surround Sound Theater where engineering genius combines with a short musical piece by Blue Man Group to illustrate the elements of sound.

Each time you visit Blue Man Group—Making Waves, you can enter a free raffle for tickets to see Blue Man Group perform at The Charles River Playhouse in Boston.

The exhibit will be at the Montshire Museum through Sunday, May 8, 2011.

About the Montshire Museum of Science
The Montshire Museum of Science is a hands-on museum located in Norwich, Vermont, offering more than 100 exhibits relating to the natural and physical sciences, the environment, and technology. The building is located on 110 acres bordering the Connecticut River. The Museum’s outdoor environment is a large part of the visitor experience. Science Park is a two-acre outdoor exhibit area in a beautiful, park-like setting and connects to a network of easy to moderate nature trails for visitors of all ages.

About Boston Children’s Museum
Boston Children’s Museum exists to help children understand and enjoy the world in which they live.  It is a private, non-profit, educational institution that is recognized internationally as a research and development center and pacesetter for children's exhibitions, educational programs and curriculum.  Boston Children’s Museum focuses on three key areas of expertise: visitor programs, teacher resources and early childhood education.  More information about Boston Children’s Museum can be found at http://www.BostonChildrensMuseum.org.

About Blue Man Group
Blue Man Group is best known for their wildly popular theatrical shows and concerts, which combine music, comedy and multimedia theatrics to produce a totally unique form of entertainment.  The blissful party atmosphere created at their live events has become the trademark of a Blue Man Group experience.

The company applies its unique creative process to a wide variety of projects, including their live productions located in 7 cities worldwide, the recording of three albums; the Grammy nominated Audio, The Complex, which became the musical basis for The Complex Rock Tour, and Live At The Venetian ® - Las Vegas, available exclusively on iTunes©. This fall, Blue Man Group will be hitting the road again in their How To Be A MegaStar Tour 2.0.

Blue Man Group has also ventured into film and TV scoring (most recently the animated feature Robots), commercial campaigns (such as Intel), and television programs (like the recurring storyline in “Arrested Development”). As the company grows, it remains true to its vision of providing exciting experiences in a variety of media, which appeal to a broad range of age groups and cultural backgrounds.  http://www.BlueMan.com

About Harman/Becker and JBL:
Harman/Becker is the automotive division of Harman International Industries, Inc. JBL is one of the oldest and most respected brand names in the audio business, with products addressing the needs of both consumer and professional markets. JBL is also a division of Harman International.

Harman international is a leading manufacturer of high-quality, high fidelity audio products and electronic systems for the consumer and professional markets. With over two million vehicles on the road, Harman has become the acknowledged leader in the field of Automotive Infotainment technology integration.

The Company’s primary manufacturing facilities in the U.S. are located in California, Indiana, Kentucky and Utah.  The Company’s primary international manufacturing facilities are located in Germany, Austria, the United Kingdom, Mexico, France, Sweden, China and Hungary.  The Company’s products are sold worldwide with the largest markets being the U.S. and Germany. 

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

The Montshire Museum features Toys: The Inside Story Exhibition

Oct 01, 2010
For Immediate Release

Saturday, December 4 – Sunday, January 16
Toys, one of the most popular exhibitions for children and their families, returns to the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich Vermont for the busy holiday season.

NORWICH, VERMONT October 1, 2010 -- If your parents never let you break open your Etch-a-Sketch® to find out how it works, you'll love Toys: The Inside Story. First exhibited at the Montshire in 2007 after years of brainstorming, testing, and tinkering, Toys illustrates the simple mechanisms commonly found in toys. The exhibition features 12 engaging hands-on stations and lets visitors create their own toy-like combinations of gears, pulleys, linkages, cams, and circuits.

Jack Gets Out of His. Box gives you a close-up view of the cam combination that frees our hero “Jack,” while elsewhere we unmask the amazing collection of switches, cams and motors that make Elmo® dance and Mr. Machine® run.

Many of the exhibits are free form and open-ended in the traditional Montshire fashion. Gears at Play illustrates the effects of gear ratios as you figure out how to arrange oversized gears to spin ballerinas and a carousel. The Jeepers Peepers challenge at the pulley table may take a little experimentation to solve; the Circuit Table lets you safely use your fingers to trace working sound and light circuits.

Toys was conceived and created by the Museum’s exhibit staff with funding from a National Science Foundation grant awarded to the Montshire in 2004 and shared with six museum partners around the country comprising the TEAMS (Traveling Exhibits at Museums of Science) collaborative. Since its Montshire debut in March of 2007, the Toys: The Inside Story exhibition has traveled to seven other science museums around the country.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Double Exposure exhibition portrays warming climate through photos

Sep 13, 2010
For Immediate Release

You don't need to be a scientist to get the picture.

Norwich, Vermont—Global warming is affecting our planet in countless ways. Need proof? Double Exposure; Photographing Climate Change, a profound exhibition on display at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, September 25 through November 28, pairs stunning, eye-opening photographs of glaciers in Alaska and the Alps.

These arresting photographs, taken by legendary mountaineer Bradford Washburn and Boston Globe writer and photographer David Arnold, document the warming climate by comparing two photographs taken decades apart but at the same angle, vantage point and elevation.

A text panel accompanies each pair, and two additional panels introduce the exhibit and explain some of the logistical challenges of re-creating artwork in most cases recorded seven decades ago. Global warming expert Gabriela Romanow created educational panels with the intent to demonstrate the many challenges and opportunities associated with global climate change.
The gap between Washburn and Arnold's panoramas of Alaska and Switzerland reveal the shifting glacial landscapes. For example, in Blackstone Bay, Alaskan winters are 10 degrees warmer now than in 1937, with more moisture in the air, more snow, and glaciers melting at a faster rate than snow falling.

In Washburn's 1937 photograph, the edges of all five glaciers touch Blackstone Bay. In Arnold's 2007 photograph, glaciers that once lapped at Blackstone Bay have retreated or narrowed where they met at the bay.
Alaska's Guyot Glacier has retreated 14 miles since 1938 when Washburn first photographed it. Since then, enough ice has melted from this one glacier to provide for all of New York City's water needs for 97 years.
The exhibit also includes a short video loop of the final interview with Washburn, recorded shortly before he died. In it, Washburn humbly describes his initial task of taking the aerial shots, in which he was literally chained inside an airplane, holding a massive camera as the pilot made turns to achieve the proper downward angle so that Washburn could capture the lay of the land.

"All I was trying to do was to get good pictures," the photographer, then in his early 90s, said. "And sometimes I would get pictures that were artistic and had some science to them."
Two 12-foot-long panoramas, one by each photographer, taken 40 miles east of Anchorage include a text panel that details the danger Washburn put himself in, as opposed to Arnold's feat with a much more nimble helicopter. Making this exhibit all the more compelling.

Washburn (1910-2007) was a photographer, alpinist, cartographer, adventurer, and president of Boston's Museum of Science from 1938 until 1980. Arnold is a freelance photographer and journalist who was a staff reporter at the Boston Globe for 25 years. This exhibition is made possible with support from the Wilcox Family Foundation.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Exploring Regional Climate Change at the Montshire Museum

Sep 13, 2010
For Immediate Release

Norwich, Vermont--Seasons of Change: Global Warming in Your Backyard, an interactive exhibition at the Montshire Museum of Science September 18 – December 5, invites you to explore and learn about regional impacts of climate change in New England.

Forests and plant life are at the heart of many distinctively New England experiences— admiring autumn’s kaleidoscope of colors as you hike a woodland trail in the White Mountains, enjoying a juicy red tomato from the local farmer's market, or savoring the taste of pure Vermont maple syrup and fresh Maine blueberries on your morning pancakes.

Seasons of Change illustrates how global climate change is impacting the landscape of New England. Will farmers be able to produce maple syrup a hundred years from now? View maple sugar records that track annual production. How will sea levels affect our coastal cities and towns? Compare records of coastal flooding today with projections for the year 2100 on a large interactive touch screen. Use the climate simulator to explore alternative approaches to moderate climate change, while receiving immediate feedback on each approach.

Learn how you can become a Citizen Scientist and develop your own project to study the environment. Projects can range from bird watching to water testing or temperature tracking. Learn how to get started and how data collected from people like you help us understand our environment and our climate.

Developed by the Center for Environmental Studies at Brown University, Seasons of Change has been generously funded by the National Science Foundation.
This exhibition is made possible with support from the Wilcox Family Foundation.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

The Dynamic Earth exhibition opens at the Montshire Saturday, June 26, 2010.

Jun 11, 2010
For Immediate Release

The Dynamic Earth exhibition is bound to grab your attention and spark your imagination.

Norwich, VT-- Opening Saturday, June 26, 2010 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, The Dynamic Earth provides visitors with an intuitive understanding of earth's active and changing systems that shape our global environment— whether it's weather patterns, ocean currents, plate tectonics, or volcanoes and earthquakes.

A recent grant from NASA has allowed the Montshire Museum of Science to develop the Dynamic Earth exhibition that includes ten different exhibit pieces. Daily programs and activities for adults and children will also take place during the exhibition.

“There is a real need, perhaps now more than ever, to provide museum exhibits and programming aimed at increasing the public’s understanding of science in general, and Earth processes in particular,” says Brian Dade, Associate Professor of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College and an advisor to the project.

The Dynamic Globe, with its sphere shaped screen, is an exciting and integral part of the Dynamic Earth exhibition. The digital video globe measuring almost three feet in diameter is a powerful tool with a stunning visual impact. The Dynamic Globe was created for the Montshire by Global Imagination and utilizes the Magic Planet globe's sophisticated digital projection system. Visitors can choose from six different animations that project NASA satellite images on the globe showing changes on the earth over time. Montshire 'explainers' will utilize other features of the globe for daily programs.

During the unveiling of the administration’s Educate to Innovate campaign, an initiative to encourage students to pursue science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), President Obama used Magic Planet as an example of innovative technology that can help students learn about global phenomena in an exciting and intuitive new way. Obama says the dynamic, interactive Magic Planet digital video globe is "an innovative and engaging way of teaching young people about our world.”

Other components of the Dynamic Earth exhibition include Windows on Earth. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Windows on Earth was conceived and developed by TERC, an educational non-profit, and the Association of Space Explorers, to support public engagement and learning about Earth. Tectonic Basin, Fluid Turbulence, Create a Vortex, Caldera, and four other interactive exhibit pieces give visitors a chance to experience how earth process work.

Dynamic Earth is an interactive, visual, and compelling exhibition allowing people to discover new things each time they visit.

Dynamic Earth is free with Museum admission ($10 for adults, $8 for children 2-17, and free for members and children under 2) and will be at the Montshire through Sunday, November 28, 2010. Additional sponsorship support has been provided by Geokon.

Montshire members are invited to preview Dynamic Earth at the special member opening Friday, June 25 from 5:30 to 7p.m.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Dinosaurs create more excitement than any other type of visiting exhibition

Oct 01, 2009
For Immediate Release

Dinosaurs create more excitement at the Montshire Museum of Science than any other type of visiting exhibition.

NORWICH, Vt.--From October 1, 2009 to January 3, 2010 the Montshire is hosting Dinosaur Days, featuring two dinosaur exhibitions on display at once! This will be the Museum’s largest exhibition event—the perfect way to celebrate the Montshire’s 20th year in its Norwich, Vermont location.

Imagine being a living, breathing dinosaur. Visitors to the Montshire Museum will be able to experience some of the greatest mysteries of paleontology in a completely interactive way. Designed with the assistance of world-renowned paleontologists, Be the Dinosaur: Life in the Cretaceous brings dinosaurs alive through the magic of interactive digital simulation, the same technology behind countless animated films. Only this time you're not in the audience—you are the star of the show! The exhibition’s sophisticated computer simulation recreates an extinct ecosystem and provides an opportunity for visitors to inhabit this virtual world and be a living, breathing dinosaur.

During Dinosaur Days, Montshire visitors will also have the opportunity to see a full- size skeleton of an adult rearing Jobaria towering 33 feet over the Museum’s main exhibit gallery and an African pterosaur soaring overhead—the most complete pterosaur skeleton ever unearthed from the African continent. GIANTS: African Dinosaurs showcases the African finds of world-renowned paleontologist Dr. Paul Sereno and brings to life some of the most important dinosaur discoveries of the last decade. Towering dinosaur skeletons, touchable fossils, and life-sized flesh models will transform the Museum’s exhibit galleries. GIANTS: African Dinosaurs, created by Project Exploration, is the first public exhibition of its kind featuring Africa's lost dinosaur world.

Experience it all at the Montshire.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Birds in Art Exhibition Opens September 5 at the Montshire Museum

Sep 01, 2009
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VERMONT—August 31, 2009 Birds in Art, a traveling exhibition of some of the world’s finest contemporary artworks about birds, will make its only Northeast stop at the Montshire Museum of Science September 5 - 25 and October 1 -12. (The Museum will be closed September 26 - 30.)

Featuring a truly international group of painters and sculptors from 10 countries, the juried show organized by the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wisconsin has earned a reputation as one of the world's most premiere wildlife art shows.

From super-realism to highly creative works, the 60 artists in the exhibition explore a variety of techniques, ideas, and species in two or three dimensions. Arizona artist Adele Earnshaw uses traditional oil on canvas to depict barn swallows jetting past freshly laundered sheets on a clothesline, while the German artist Harro Maass portrays a skimmer with its scalpel- like bill slicing open the surface of the painting!

Celebrate the great beauty and diversity of birds at the Montshire Museum in Norwich, Vermont, beginning September 5. Birds in Art is free with Museum admission.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum Receives $492,704 Grant from NASA

Jun 16, 2009
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vermont, June 16, 2009. The Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont, has received a five-year National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) grant worth $492,704. The Museum was one of only 13 selected from a highly competitive field of institutions nationwide submitting proposals to NASA's Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums. The Montshire is the only institution in New England to be awarded funding through this grant program.

Montshire's program, The Dynamic Earth: You Have to See It to Believe It! will enable the Museum to develop of a variety of educational exhibits and programs using NASA images of our home planet to engage visitors in learning about the forces that shape and change the Earth, both natural and manmade.

"There is a real need, perhaps now more than ever, to provide museum exhibits and programming aimed at increasing the public's understanding of science in general, and Earth processes in particular," says Brian Dade, Associate Professor of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College and an advisor to the project.

The Earth is a complex system, with myriad processes interacting to create a changing landscape across space and time. The key focus of The Dynamic Earth is to further the public's understanding of the processes that shape our global environment. Examples of these dynamic processes include delta formation at the mouths of rivers, seasonal changes of ocean surface temperatures and ocean currents, and changing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and long-term climate change.

"This important grant will allow the Montshire to develop specific exhibitions and program activities using NASA's satellite imagery," explains Greg DeFrancis, director of education at the Montshire Museum of Science. "NASA's suite of Earth observing satellites and its 30-plus year history of collecting Earth imagery can now be used to visualize changes at a planetary-scale only dreamed of just a few years ago," comments DeFrancis. "By incorporating these images into programs and activities, we will engage Museum visitors in understanding how natural and human-influenced processes interact with each other to form our physical and living environment."

"Vermont and the Upper Connecticut Valley are incredibly fortunate to have a science center that is able to successfully compete for grant funding at a national level. With this NASA award, the Montshire Museum continues to demonstrate that it is one of the best science centers in the country. It enriches our region," said U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont.

Students, teachers, families and adults will all benefit from the integration of the new educational programs with a series of exhibits and theater programs designed to illuminate the Earth's systems and phenomena.

The Montshire will present a cluster of exhibits highlighting the changes of the Earth's surface and how we view it. These exhibits will include Planetary Landscapes: Sculpting the Solar System and Windows on Earth. A new virtual video globe exhibit will show animations of atmospheric and ocean processes projected on a globe.

Programs developed under the umbrella of this grant will include exhibit hall demonstrations, hands-on family activities, teacher professional development, adult lectures, and classroom workshops.

In addition, the Montshire will develop and pilot ancillary exhibit interpretation materials aimed specifically at the Grade 4-9 audience. "For this constituency, our goal is to create more meaningful field trip experiences that help teachers and students meet the learning goals of their Earth Science curriculum," DeFrancis remarks.

Montshire Museum's grant project will benefit from collaboration with Dartmouth College scientists from the departments of Physics and Astronomy, and Geology; and climate researchers at the U.S Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory in Hanover, NH. The Montshire also will partner with colleagues at the Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, California, to develop two new multimedia presentations using the Science Theater Educational Programming System (STEPS). In addition, Museum staff will work with the Goddard Space Flight Center's Scientific Visualization Studio to use imagery and animations in the exhibit components and theater programs developed for this project.

The first elements of programming will be introduced to the public during the winter of 2010. At the conclusion of the five-year grant period, the Montshire will have created a comprehensive Earth science program that helps Museum audiences better understand our global environment. This initiative will reach thousands of school children and hundreds of thousands of Museum visitors and will result in a broader awareness of NASA's contributions to Earth science.

"The Montshire Museum has long been a valuable educational resource for the Upper Valley and beyond," Congressman Peter Welch of Vermont said. "I'm thrilled they have earned this much-deserved grant, which will help them further their mission of educating and inspiring Vermonters of all ages."

Proposals to NASA's grant program were selected through a merit-based, external peer-review process. NASA's Office of Education and mission directorates collaborated to solicit and review the grant applications. This integrated approach distinguishes NASA's investment in informal education. NASA received proposals from 32 states and the District of Columbia. "The generosity of Montshire's constituents makes it possible for the Museum to compete on a national scale for grants like this one. Contributions to Montshire's operations work side-by-side with specifically designated grants such as this to provide the best possible experiences and services to our constituents," remarks Montshire Museum Director David Goudy.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

The Montshire Museum features Toys: The Inside Story Exhibition Saturday, May 30 – Sunday, August 16

May 11, 2009
For Immediate Release

Toys, one of the most popular exhibitions for children and their families, returns to the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich Vermont for the busy summer season.

NORWICH, VERMONT May 11, 2009 -- If your parents never let you break open your Etch-a-Sketch® to find out how it works, you'll love Toys: The Inside Story. First exhibited at the Montshire in 2007 after years of brainstorming, testing, and tinkering, Toys illustrates the simple mechanisms commonly found in toys. The exhibition features 12 engaging hands-on stations and lets visitors create their own toy-like combinations of gears, pulleys, linkages, cams, and circuits.

Jack Gets Out of His Box gives you a close-up view of the cam combination that frees our hero “Jack,” while elsewhere we unmask the amazing collection of switches, cams and motors that make Elmo® dance and Mr. Machine® run.

Many of the exhibits are free-form and open-ended in the traditional Montshire fashion. Gears at Play illustrates the effects of gear ratios as you figure out how to arrange oversized gears to spin ballerinas and a carousel. The Jeepers Peepers challenge at the pulley table may take a little experimentation to solve; the Circuit Table lets you safely use your fingers to trace working sound and light circuits.

Toys was conceived and created by the Museum’s exhibit staff with funding from a National Science Foundation grant awarded to the Montshire in 2004 and shared with six museum partners around the country comprising the TEAMS (Traveling Exhibits at Museums of Science) collaborative. Since its Montshire debut in March of 2007, the Toys: The Inside Story exhibition has traveled to seven other science museums around the country.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

WPTZ recently featured Transitions in a news story

Apr 02, 2009
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, Vt. -- An art exhibit that started at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC has made its way to New England.

Link to full story: Smithsonian Exhibit Comes To Upper Valley

What makes Robert Creamer's photography unique is that he doesn't use a camera, and now his exhibit is on a tour around the country for people to see and learn about an art form of the future. The medium used in Creamer's exhibit "transitions," at the Montshire Museum, is a scanner. He arranges flowers, bones, fossils and other objects found in nature on top of a large flat bed scanner, then prints them at a high resolution.

"I think there's a remarkable blend now with the arts and technology and science," the artist said at the exhibit on Thursday.

The exhibit will be on display at the Montshire Museum in Norwich, Vt. until May 25.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition, Transitions: Photographs by Robert Creamer,

Mar 12, 2009
For Immediate Release

New England debut March 25, at the Montshire Museum of Science.

NORWICH, VT -- Digital technology reveals the beauty of nature in Robert Creamer’s latest work. Transitions: Photographs by Robert Creamer, an exhibition organized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and circulated by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), showcases how beauty can be found in the most unexpected places.

Transitions will be on view at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vermont from March 25 to May 24, 2009, and will then continue on an 11-city, national tour through 2011.

Robert Creamer is renowned for using contemporary digital technology to convey a melancholy beauty. “I’m challenging the traditional notion of beauty as something perfect and flawless,” said Creamer about his photographs, many of which show flowers in various stages of decay. In creating the works for this stunning exhibition, Creamer traded his usual camera for a flatbed scanner. His compositions use flora and fauna that are placed directly on the scanner in aesthetic arrangements or suspended over it. The resulting detail is eerily lifelike and yet incredibly expressive.

Transitions features 39 of Robert Creamer’s high-resolution images created exclusively for the exhibition. Many are paired to show a subject in transition. This exhibition also features a video by videographer Jeannie Yoon about Creamer’s scanning and printing techniques. “My maturing imagination returns me again and again to botanicals. I enjoy exploring the transitory nature of beauty and am constantly enthused by the serendipitous understandings and new relationships that this technique reveals to me,” said Creamer.

Robert Creamer’s association with the Smithsonian began when he scanned a variety of objects and specimens at the Naturalist Center, an educational outreach facility of the National Museum of Natural History located near Leesburg, Virginia. That experience led to scans of the scientific collections housed at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

Creamer has transitioned multiple times himself during the 30 years of his professional photography career. His talents include botany, photography, natural history and teaching. He is also a widely published fine art and architectural photographer. He started using the scanner on a whim in 2002 when he found a dead hummingbird in his Maryland neighborhood. After experimenting with the bird, he continued to scan plants and animals from his backyard and those that were brought home to him by his children and even his cat. Those initial scans inspired his artistic vision catapulting him to a new realm of visual art. He began selecting material based on his intuition of how it would develop in the short time ahead and how it would look like scanned. He monitored his specimens closely looking for the exact moment that some new point of view was revealed.

SITES has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for more than 50 years. SITES connects Americans to their shared cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Planetary Landscapes: Sculpting the Solar System

Jan 14, 2009
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VERMONT-- Imagine passing your hand through a cauldron of billowing fog, activating a vortex akin to the dust devils of the Martian atmosphere, or altering the patterns of thousands of tiny steel balls as they cascade and generate electrical charges. Internationally renowned artist Ned Kahn brings these experiences to life through his exhibition Planetary Landscapes: Sculpting the Solar System, opening at the Montshire Museum of Science on Saturday, January 17.

Kahn's interactive sculptures are designed to explore, in constantly varying patterns, the dynamic forces that shape our solar system. Kahn's fascination with astronomy was sparked by images: "You see a picture of a galaxy," he says, "and you know that stars are speeding through it, gases are flowing in, and jets of plasma are shooting out. I wanted to see these things move. I wanted to animate these images; that was my jumping-off point."

To accomplish this, the artist combines familiar elements like fog and air, water and sand, air and water. The fluid, ever-changing results often bear startling resemblances to astronomical phenomena. "It's sort of mind-boggling," Kahn says gleefully, "that a whole bunch of stars can behave in ways that are somewhat similar to a whole bunch of tiny water droplets."

In Planetary Landscapes, Ned Kahn has created an entire family of artwork that brings vast natural processes within our reach, and sends our imaginations on a journey through the cosmos. The exhibition will remain at the Montshire Museum through Sunday, March 15 thanks to local support from Hypertherm, Inc. Planetary Landscapes was developed by the Chabot Space & Science Center with support from the National Science Foundation.

If you would like to set up an interview with artist Ned Kahn, contact Beth Krusi at 802-649-2200 x222 or beth.krusi@montshire.org.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Save on School Visits to the Montshire

Dec 04, 2008
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VERMONT--With support from Bank of America Charitable Foundation, school visits to the Montshire Museum of Science are only $1.00 per student from January 12 to February 6, 2009.

A visit to the Montshire offers teachers and schools an exciting opportunity to enrich their science curriculum and to provide students a unique hands-on learning experience. School and family budgets are stretched thin, so this special opportunity will help ensure that a Montshire experience is more accessible to schools and students.

Studies show that enjoyable, hands-on experiences in science centers promote creativity, communication and positive attitudes toward science. For many young people, these combine to enhance self-confidence, provide important skills, and increase motivation in school. In addition, a new study shows that developing children's interest in science before age 13 is an important strategy if we want a society with skilled and enthusiastic scientists who are ready to address the world's complex problems.

School visits to the Montshire are often combined with a workshop that is closely aligned with a teacher's science curriculum. Workshop topics are based on subjects covered in the Vermont and New Hampshire science standards, providing a way for teachers to tie their Montshire field trip experience to their school's science curriculum needs, especially when the trip is scheduled in the heart of the school year.

Through generous support from the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, the Montshire Museum this year will be able to serve more than 5,000 New Hampshire school children with meaningful learning experiences and memories that they will treasure.

"Preparing our youth to succeed both in school and in their careers is one of the most valuable investments we can make as a community," said John Weeks, New Hampshire Market President, Bank of America. "Bank of America is pleased to help provide this unique opportunity to so many young students in New Hampshire."

This special rate is for school groups of 10 or more and advanced registration is required. Interested schools and teachers should register early, as space is limited. Call 802-649-2200 or visit http://www.montshire.org/programs for more information.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Montshire Museum of Science Among the Country’s Top 25 Science Centers

Aug 21, 2008
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VERMONT -Are science centers just for adults? Not according to a poll conducted by Parents magazine. They found that about a third of the nation's science centers have galleries designed specifically for children 6 and under.

According to Parents magazine (September, 2008), the top ten science centers and 15 runners-up are, "innovative places that are bound to inspire more than a few pint-sized Einsteins."

Most of the top science centers are located in large cities around the country. In New England, the Museum of Science in Boston and the Montshire Museum in Norwich, Vermont are the only two that made the list.

The top 10 are the Center of Science and Industry (COSI) in Columbus, Ohio; the Exploratorium in San Francisco; the Museum of Science in Boston; Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, N.J.; the St. Louis Science Center in St. Louis, Mo.; the New York Hall of Science in Flushing, Queens, in New York City; the California Science Center in Los Angeles; the Sci-Port Discovery Center in Shreveport, La.; the Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia; and the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore.

Parents magazine also identified 15 runners-up: Discovery Science Center, Santa Ana, Calif.; Detroit Science Center, Detroit; Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh; the Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile, Ala.; the Louisville Science Center, Louisville, Ky.; Pacific Science Center, Seattle; Wonderlab Museum of Science, Health, & Technology, Bloomingtown, Ind.; Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago; Discovery Place, Charlotte, N.C.; and The Children's Museum of Science and Technology, Troy, N.Y.; Sci-Works, Winston-Salem, N.C.; Science City at Union Station, in Kansas City, Mo.; Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, Calif.; the Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Vermont.; and Discovery Science Place, Tyler, Texas.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Touring Exhibition From Here to There Zooms into Montshire

May 29, 2008
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VT. --Trains, planes, boats, automobiles, and many other modes of transportation were designed over the ages to convey travelers ever more rapidly from point "A" to point "B." Explore the science behind different methods of locomotion when the traveling exhibition From Here to There zooms into the Montshire on June 14!

Some of its eleven exhibit stations explore how humans have harnessed natural phenomena like wind and water to get us moving. Set Sail challenges you to glide sailboats through the water by altering rudder and sail positions; change the wind direction for a new challenge as you navigate to the next "port." Water Ways illustrates how large cargo ships move through a canal. Operate an authentic lock system as you move your boat through different water levels.

Other exhibits show how forces like magnetism and air pressure can be harnessed for locomotion. MagLev (for "magnetic levitation") is a terrific demonstration of how trains, levitated by strong magnetic fields, "float" in the air and travel at amazing speeds. Sit down, strap yourself in, and take a ride on the amazing Hovercraft. Feel yourself lift off over a cushion of air that lets you twist, turn, and travel with ease across the floor. Accompanying interactive components also let you explore how air pressure makes a real hovercraft work.

Give it a Lift shows how many machines provide a mechanical advantage to transport passengers. Lift identical weights using pneumatics, pulleys, hydraulics and levers. Which is the easiest to lift? How can you lift the weight using less effort? Feel the Friction illustrates a force that causes things that move across land, air, or water to slow down. Try moving different weights across soil, along train tracks, or through the water. Which one takes less effort?

From Here to There was developed by The Rochester Museum and Science Center of Rochester, N.Y., and the Sciencenter of Ithaca, N.Y., as part of the Traveling Exhibits At Museums of Science (TEAMS) collaborative, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. This local appearance is sponsored by Geokon, Inc. The exhibition will be on display through September 7 and is free with Museum admission.

Press Contact: Trish Palao, Marketing and Communications Manager
Montshire Museum of Science, One Montshire Road, Norwich, VT 05055 

802-649-2200 x222 | trish.palao@montshire.org

Using Plants in the Wild

May 27, 2008
For Immediate Release

NORWICH, VT. -- Learn about useful wild plants in our local flora through Using Plants in the Wild, an enlightening workshop co-hosted by the Montshire Museum's Center for Native Plant Studies and the New England Wild Flower Society (NEWFS).

On Saturday, June 14, join botanist and primitive skills specialist Arthur Haines outside at the Montshire for a special hands-on exploration of the wild plants found in our local woods and long used for various purposes by Native Americans. In this workshop, held from 2 to 4 p.m., you will sample wild food, make cords, and learn about some of the many useful products that can be made with local plants. You will see a demonstration of friction fire making using native plant materials, and you'll encounter plants first-hand as you learn their interesting stories. Come prepared to gain an enhanced appreciation of the importance of wild flora for human survival; come prepared as well for all weather conditions, as you'll experience plants in the wild, rain or shine.

To register, please contact NEWFS at 508-877-7630 (ext. 3303) or visit http://www.newfs.org. Montshire and NEWFS members $25, non-members $30.