About

From its humble beginnings in an old bowling alley to its current status as a nationally recognized science museum, the Montshire Museum has nurtured an interest in the natural and physical world for more than a million visitors and tens of thousands of schoolchildren in New Hampshire and Vermont.

History and Overview

The Montshire Museum was founded in 1974, and opened to the public two years later in Hanover, N.H. The “new” Montshire opened 15 years later, and has continued to add to its facilities in Norwich, Vermont, including the outdoor water and sound exhibits in David Goudy Science Park in 2002, and the Hughes Pavilion in 2010.

The Montshire is now one of the busiest museums in northern New England, attracting about 150,000 visitors annually. The Museum’s school programs also reach more than 13,000 schoolchildren in New Hampshire and Vermont.

"Montshire Museum’s mission is to awaken and encourage a lifelong interest in science through exhibits and programming dedicated to hands-on discovery and education for people of all ages. Unique to this mission is Montshire’s 100-acre New England riverfront setting, which fosters deep and creative learning in both the physical and natural sciences.” - Montshire Board of Trustees mission statement, 2012

The Museum has received grants from NASA, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, as well as science and education foundations. In recent years, the Museum has partnered with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Vermont Center for Ecostudies and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Dartmouth. Dartmouth College and the Museum have created the Dartmouth-Montshire Institute for Science Education.

Follow the links to read our timeline, learn more about the Montshire’s grants, partnerships, and collaborations, and find out about the Montshire in the news.

Executive Director Marcos Stafne posts regularly about the Montshire, its work, and its mission - read the latest Marcos at the Montshire post at www.montshire.org/marcos-at-the-montshire.