Frankenstein and the Philosophy of Science

Montshire Talks: Frankenstein200 is a Montshire conversation series that celebrates the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s "Frankenstein"

From a philosopher’s perspective, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein operates on several levels:  A philosophical exploration of what it means to be human, the nature of science and scientific knowledge—at a pivotal and transitional moment in the history of science—and the role of the scientist in society. Contextualizing these philosophical and scientific issues helps us see Frankenstein as a fascinating and provocative exploration of questions about human nature and the human condition, the quest for knowledge, and the nature of moral responsibility. Dr. Michael Ashooh specializes in the philosophy of science and explores the context in which Frankenstein was written, as well as the lasting scientific and moral questions raised by this modern myth. 

Dr. Michael Ashooh is a lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Vermont.  Professor Ashooh teaches courses in Introduction to Philosophy, Ethics, Medical Ethics, Kant, and the Philosophy of Science.  He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto.  

Montshire Talks: Frankenstein200 is a Montshire conversation series that celebrates the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Through her work of science fiction, Shelley has sparked the imaginations of generations who question the balance of human creativity, societal responsibility, and scientific ethics. Montshire Talks: Frankenstein200 surveys the philosophy of science, artificial intelligence, how popular culture evolves a modern myth, and Mary Shelley’s lasting influence on the questions: What is life? Why do we create? and What are our responsibilities as creators, scientists, and engineers? 

This year's Montshire Talks are sponsored by Ledyard National Bank.